Archive for the ‘Wellbeing’ Category

The connection between sports and spirituality is natural   2 comments

As we talked through the half-time state of play of his soccer match, my grandson expressed an openness to some helpful ideas I shared with him. He went back on and scored a goal immediately, and soon after I saw him patting a team-mate on the back following a similar success.

Rather than counselling on techniques or from a sports psychology perspective, I’d focussed his attention on the spiritual nature of the game: had he noticed that when they worked together as a team quite a big change occurred? I shared how love for individual team members and joy in the game itself is what brings success. When he felt a teammate wasn’t working as a team-player my grandson could go out of his way to applaud his efforts, even if his mate wasn’t reciprocating yet. On this otherwise unremarkable Saturday morning, a spiritual approach to his soccer match had transformed his game, and the score.

The extensive scholarly literature about sport and spirituality reports experiences by many thousands of athletes, with and without religious affiliations, that are frequently described as spiritual. They are collectively called “being in the zone.” Sports psychologist, Mark Nesti, has identified that spiritual experiences in sport have much in common with feelings of intense love.

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Learning how love, joy, compassion, strength, balance and respect lead to sports success is important. Even more important, is to know that the source of our ability to express them is divine. Athletes who know this might practise these five essentials.

Always start with stillness. Your affirmation could go like this: Divine Life and Love, God, you are with me right there on the field (or court or track or slope or wave). As Mind (another name for God), you are helping me to know exactly what to do during the game.

Discover true strength. Knowing that we reflect the infinite strength, flexibility and quickness of the divine, we’ll experience less physical limitation in sports. Mary Baker Eddy, in her ground-breaking book, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, sheds light on this connection. “The Scriptures say, “They that wait upon the Lord . . . shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” The meaning of that passage is not perverted by applying it literally to moments of fatigue, for the moral and physical are as one in their results.”

Let love lead you. You’re not there to impress people but to express goodness and love. God is Love and doesn’t take sides; so, show sportsmanship towards the opposition and wholeheartedly love the game.

Enjoy yourself. Know that your confidence, freedom and success depend entirely on ever-present divine Mind. This relieves us from feeling that pressure is squarely on us to perform. Getting pumped is not what’s needed either, implying that we’ll eventually need to come down from a false high. It also stands to reason that the short-lived benefits of cheating or sports fixing cannot compete with the health-giving, joy-enhancing effects of honesty, courage and integrity in sport.

Stay safe. Spiritual ideas move in harmony – complementing each other, instead of hurting each other. “We live and move and have our being in God,” the Bible quotes Paul as saying. Knowing this, we are always safe.

Kay Stroud writes about the connection between spirituality and health, practices Christian Science healing and is spokesperson for Christian Science in NSW, QLD, ACT and NT http://www.health4thinkers.com

Look ahead in the New Year. It’s good for your health.   Leave a comment

 

Happy New Year! It’s an exciting time for everyone. Or is it? For some people, it may be a continuation of last year’s old dismal way of living. For others, it’ll be an opportunity to look ahead – to set new goals, make an exhilarating fresh start, see the potential of fulfilling long-held dreams, or implementing new ways to achieve greater health and happiness. Being a look ahead kind of person helps foster positive prospects for a better life. So if this is what you’d like to achieve this year, check out the tips and implement them in the weeks ahead. You can do it, and, it’s good for your health.

 

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LOOK AHEAD, NOT BACK.

 If you want to get the most out of the New Year, be forward looking. Don’t look back or remain stuck in a mental rut. Think progressively. Be bold. Make changes. Applying this look ahead attitude to daily life, benefits your mental, emotional and physical wellbeing at home, and in the workplace.

 

TIPS:

– Look ahead. Aim to live a splendidly useful, active life. Enjoy thinking about and planning what you’re going to do in the next 12 months. Do something different. Take up a new activity. Relish what lies ahead for you.

– Be assured that your future holds an abundance of love, kind people and happy experiences. Love and goodness come from a divine source and are continuously present.

– Look forward with confidence. If you foresee difficulties in the days ahead, have courage. Knowthat you possess the spiritual poise, calm strength, and wisdom to triumph over them.

– Don’t look back. Leave the past behind. Stand porter at the door of thought”. Shut out any “unhealthy thoughts and fears.” Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p.392

– Say goodbye to yesterday. Drop all bitterness and regret. “Forget what happened in the past, and do not dwell on events from long ago.” The Bible. Isaiah 43:18.    

– If the New Year offers change – a new beginning, enthusiastically embrace it. Forget “the things that are behind” and reach out “for the things that are ahead.” The Bible. Philippians 3:13.  

– Move forward. Take positive action to improve your everyday life. Resolve to be a more patient parent, work colleague, and road-user. Be grateful for the good you have right now. Express your appreciation to others. Say “thank you” more often.

– So get started! As the next 365 days begin, anticipate receiving the blessings each day holds. Be excited. Look ahead in the New Year. It’s good for your health.

ABOUT THE EXPERT:

Beverly Goldsmith writes on the connection between spirituality and health and is a Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing. Twitter: @GoldsmithBev

 

Be comforted and comforting. It’s good for your health   1 comment

Sometimes life can seem too hard to bear. When this happens we need to be comforted – to receive a gentle hug, comforting words, a helping hand, or other supportive actions. Such compassionate and thoughtful attention can lessen grief, make distress seem lighter, and bring healing relief. These tender outcomes demonstrate how allowing yourself to be comforted, or giving comfort to someone else, is beneficial, and therefore is good for your health.

BE COMFORTED BY OTHERS

When difficult times come along, being comforted by a family member, friend or work colleague, can help ease feelings of sorrow, reduce worry, strengthen courage and inspire hope.

 

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TIPS:

– Humbly accept someone’s gift of caring. Comfort is love. It’s a spiritual quality that soothes hurt and brings peace. Never be too proud to be comforted by others.

– Allow the comfort of others to inspire you. Comfort is hope. It’s courage to overcome trouble through the uplifting “wisdom, Truth, or Love — [that] blesses the human family with crumbs of comfort… ”. Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p. 234

– If you’re alone. Don’t feel comfortless. There‘s a divine Love always present with you. And just like a mother, that Love is supporting, comforting and strengthening you, now and always.

BE COMFORTING TO OTHERS

Bless others. Comfort them. Help restore their wellbeing, contentment and security.

TIPS:

– Comfort your children. In times of tragedy remind them that good is always present. Fred Rogers, a popular American children’s’ TV show host, relates how as a boy when he saw scary things in the news, his mother would say to him, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping”. To this day, especially in times of disaster, he says, “I remember my mother’s words, and I’m always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in this world.”

– Express your mothering qualities. Never withhold comforting words or actions. Be ready to console, reassure, encourage. Reach out to others through the divine Love “who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received”. The Bible,

II Corinthians 1:4

– Be brave. Put aside any doubts. Do what you can to lessen someone’s sorrow. Don’t hold back. No matter how small or simple you think your words or actions are, be assured that if they come from your heart, they will be just right. You can be comforted and comforting. It’s good for your health.

ABOUT THE EXPERT:

Beverly Goldsmith writes about the connection between spirituality and health and is a Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing. Twitter: @GoldsmithBev

 

 

How a Change of Consciousness brings Healing   Leave a comment

Read how this writer experienced healing of sudden and overwhelming symptoms of the flu, nose bleed and abdominal pain when she “focused on turning thought away from the body and to God.”

She shares: ” I have always loved Mary Baker Eddy’s description in her book Unity of Good of how Christ Jesus healed: “He demanded a change of consciousness and evidence, and effected this change through the higher laws of God” (p. 11). If Jesus could do this, then I could too. He said so.

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I continued to demand a change of  consciousness and evidence. The change in consciousness involved exchanging mortal thinking and belief in material laws for the divine laws of Spirit—ever present and all-powerful. The change in evidence was natural as I acknowledged the truth of perfect Mind and perfect reflection, “perfect God and perfect man” (Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 259). The so-called body must be governed by the Mind that governs man. It has no alternative.”

https://sentinel.christianscience.com/shared/view/5pbba2e56g?s=e

Embrace life changes! It’s good for your health.   Leave a comment

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Like the weather, some changes in life are unpredictable. They can be surprising, unforeseen – like suddenly being promoted at work, or becoming a parent for the first time. While a life-changing event can be exciting, others can be hard to cope with – especially if they’re unexpectedly thrust upon you. One way to deal with stormy life-changing events, is to change up one’s thinking, take positive action and embrace life changes! Doing so is good for your health.

EMBRACE CHANGE

When something you’ve loved is snatched away, feelings of hurt and disappointment can rain down upon you. You wonder how to carry on. When this happens, it’s time to use the umbrella of spiritual-type thinking to shelter your heart, restore peace of mind and move you forward to happiness and healing.

TIPS:

Rather than standing under the grey clouds of disappointment and discouragement, lift up your thinking. Have courage. Embrace the change. Open your heart and welcome the good that lies ahead.

– Don’t begrudge the experience of a life change. Instead, focus on what you’ve gained, rather than what you’ve been forced to give up.

– Remember with thankfulness all that you’ve achieved, and what you can still do, and be.

– Realize that change doesn’t end things. Look past any unhappiness to the new opportunities that lie ahead. Change can be a stepping-stone to fresh prospects.

– Weather a stormy life-change. Be brave. Work on, and await the outcome. You can “steer safely amid the storm”. Mary Baker Eddy – Science and Health p.67

– Be encouraged, strengthened and reassured. You have within you the spiritual qualities of buoyancy, adaptability, and resilience. You will bounce back. You’ve been created to be mentally and emotionally strong. You can handle changed circumstances with grace and poise, and be triumphant.

– Let this poem comfort and help you embrace life changes. You’ll find it’s good for your health.

“In heavenly Love abiding, No change my heart shall fear; And safe is such confiding, For nothing changes here. The storm may roar without me, My heart may low be laid; But God [divine Love] is round about me, And can I be dismayed?

Green pastures are before me, Which yet I have not seen; Bright skies will soon be o’er me, Where darkest clouds have been. My hope I cannot measure, My path in life is free; My Father has my treasure, And He will walk with me.” Anna L. WaringIn heavenly love abiding.

 

ABOUT THE EXPERT:

Beverly Goldsmith writes on the connection between spirituality and health and is a Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing. Twitter: @GoldsmithBev

The question of time and healing   1 comment

$ dreamstime_11095603“Now is the right time to listen, the day to be helped. Don’t put it off” 

The Message: (II Corinthians 6:2, Eugene Peterson). 

“What truly matters—what in fact is absolutely necessary—is a change of thought from materiality to spiritual Truth. And though this mental and spiritual transformation may take diligent as well as patient prayer, it never requires time.

We’re always thinking. And although at times it might take persistence to yield material thoughts for those that are more spiritual, it certainly requires no more time to think a true, spiritual thought than to entertain a false, limiting, or material one. Every moment we have a choice about what we allow ourselves to mentally entertain. So the question for us becomes, What are we paying attention to—what are we seeing, acknowledging, and accepting as real, powerful, and true here and now?…..

A fuller flourishing   Leave a comment

 

In his book “A Secular Age,” renowned Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor speaks to the tremendous shift in thought that’s taken place over the past several centuries when it comes to belief in God. “[With] the coming of modern secularity…,” he  writes, “for P1040875the first time in history a purely self-sufficient humanism came to be a widely available option.” And yet, Christ Jesus linked flourishing directly to a spiritual source: “I am come that they might have life,and that they might have it more abundantly” (John 10:10). Contributor Lyle Young cites Mary Baker Eddy, the Monitor’s founder, as one who experienced this flourishing; what she learned from Jesus’ teachings healed her of chronic illness and poverty. A deeper understanding of our true nature as the reflection of infinite, divine Love nurtures a deeper, more abundant flourishing for humanity.

This articles appeared in the feature: A Christian Science Perspective in The Christian Science Monitor contributed by Lyle Young

for the full article click here:

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