Archive for the ‘Eternal life’ Category

Identity – Distinct and Eternal   1 comment

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The divine Mind maintains all identities, from a blade of grass to a star, as distinct and eternal.

(Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy p70: 12)

A Glimpse of Life Eternal … Is This Body All There is to Life?   2 comments

The members of the Christian Science community in Canberra share their experiences and thoughts on Christian Science:

Until last year Reggie was a member of our family.  He was an elderly rescue dog.  We loved him dearly and he lived with us long past his expected ‘use by’ date.

Gradually last year I noticed that he was slowing down and sleeping much of the time.  I understand that animals don’t stay with us forever.  They come and they bless us, and we them, and they move on.  It was starting to feel like Reggie might be about to move on. 

One Saturday morning he seemed to be in a long deep sleep.  By lunch time it seemed that he was going.  He couldn’t be roused and he had lost control of his bodily functions.  I sat on the floor beside his bed and turned to God.  “Tell me how to think about this,”  I asked.  Then the question came:  “Is it the body that you love?”  The answer was, of course, “No!”  “Then what?  What is it that you love?”  I could see so clearly in that moment that this body was an irrelevance.  Reggie was very real but he was not just this body.

I sat quietly and the inspirations came. I saw more clearly than I had ever done before, the immortality of life – life that was spiritual, eternal, untouched by matter and material claims.  I was so absorbed in these thoughts and what God was teaching me that I forgot to notice the body lying beside me.  My husband came to the door to see how he was going and Reggie lifted his head a little and opened his eyes.  I offered him some water and he drank it.  Within a few minutes he was sitting up.  I offered him food which he ate and shortly after that he was up and around.  The next day he was quiet but well and happy.  By Monday he was urging us to take him for a walk and when we put him on the lead he was first out the door at a run.

Reggie did leave us later that year.  Until he went he was well and active and lost none of his faculties. This time when it seemed that he was going I asked God:  “What do I need to know about this?”  The answer was different. “You know who Reggie is.  You have seen this.  Trust it.  Now is the time to let him go.  You don’t need to hang onto the body because you know that it is not the real him!”  When he left there were times when I missed him, but I can honestly say I was never sad about his absence.  I knew so well that nothing had changed.  He was still Reggie – the same gentle, loving giant he had always been.  I knew that God was still caring for him just as tenderly.

I look to thee in every need, and never look in vain;

I feel Thy touch, eternal Love, and all is well again: …

Thy hand in all things I behold, And all things in Thy hand.

Thou leadest me by unsought ways, Thou turn’st my mourning into praise.

(Christian Science Hymnal 134)

Life That is Spiritual   Leave a comment

Wednesday Testimony Meeting Readings

This recording is of readings on the topic: Life That is Spiritual

Never record ages. Chronological data are no part of the vast forever. Time-tables of birth and death are so many conspiracies against manhood and womanhood. Except for the error of measuring and limiting all that is good and beautiful, man would enjoy more than threescore years and ten and still maintain his vigor, freshness, and promise. Man, governed by immortal Mind, is always beautiful and grand. Each succeeding year unfolds wisdom, beauty, and holiness.

(Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy p246: 17)

Every Wednesday at 6.15pm a Testimony Meeting is held at the Christian Science church in Canberra (corner of Macquarie and Bligh Streets, Barton). At these meetings short readings on a particular topic are followed by time for members of the congregation to share how they have been helped and healed through prayer.

Everyone is welcome.

The Easter Story   Leave a comment

Wednesday Testimony Meeting Readings

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The garden of Gethsemane – as it is today.

Resurrection: Spiritualization of thought; a new and higher idea of immortality, or spiritual existence; material belief yielding to spiritual understanding. (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy 593: 9)

We acknowledge that the crucifixion of Jesus and his resurrection served to uplift faith to understand eternal Life, even the allness of Soul, Spirit, and the nothingness of matter.

And we solemnly promise to watch, and pray for that Mind to be in us which was also in Christ Jesus; to do unto others as we would have them do unto us; and to be merciful, just, and pure. (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy 497: 20-27)

Every Wednesday at 6.15pm a Testimony Meeting is held at the Christian Science church in Canberra (corner of Macquarie and Bligh Streets, Barton). At these meetings short readings on a particular topic are followed by time for members of the congregation to share how they have been helped and healed through prayer.

Everyone is welcome. If you are in Canberra on any Wednesday, please join us.

This recording is of Wednesday Testimony Meeting Readings on the Easter Story.

More Precious Than Eggs and Bunnies – The Real Meaning of Easter   Leave a comment

The true meaning of Easter is wondrous! Its message promises such blessings to each one of us and to our world. To hide it behind bunnies and eggs, secularism and skepticism, is heart breaking.

Jesus was crucified by the materialistic world’s hatred of his divinity. His grace and power to bring peace and healing to the world was unsurpassed and something human power could not control. It tried to silence his holy message by crucifying him. But how he reacted to such evil intent was an example to us all. He responded with the lovingkindness, calmness and confidence that could only come from the deepest understanding that evil cannot conquer goodness any more than the darkness can conquer the light.

For three days it seemed like evil had won. Then, when even the disciples had given up hope, Jesus emerged from the tomb alive.

Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Christian Science church, described this surprising re-appearance, when she said, ‘The lonely precincts of the tomb gave Jesus a refuge from his foes, a place in which to solve the great problems of being… He proved Life to be deathless and Love to be the master of hate.’

In the resurrection, Jesus proved that there is life beyond what we see, like someone journeying on after they have sailed out of our sight. I think of it like writing a sum on a page, say 2+2=4. If we destroy the page, is the truth that sum represents also destroyed, or is it eternally true and untouched? Jesus showed us that each one of us has just such an eternally true identity, something that the outward appearance only hints at, something that never dies. What a glorious message.

He also showed that to react with love instead of hate or anger, disempowers evil. This love, however, is more than human love or kindness. It is a love that has its source in God, a God that the Bible tells us is Love itself. Hatred and evil, being a lack of love, can no more stand in the face of divine Love than the darkest night can stand in the presence of the light of the dawn. Not reacting stops evil from spreading. That’s why Jesus counteracted the old thought of ‘eye for an eye’ with ‘turn the other cheek’ – don’t ever react to evil, stop it in its tracks. Is this not a message the world needs to remember and live by much more consistently? Is this not a message that could bring peace to our world? Is this not the ‘Golden Rule’ – ‘do unto others as you would have them do unto you’?

The true meaning of Easter is of the utmost importance to our own lives and to the world. If we remember it in our hearts and live it in our lives, then that precious sacrifice made by Jesus is not lost but is still as relevant today as it was 2000 years ago.

This article was contributed by Beth Packer, a practitioner of Christian Science healing, listed in the world-wide Journal of healers and member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship.

Please join us at 10.00 am on Easer Sunday at the corner of Macquarie and Bligh Streets, Barton in Canberra.

Why We Need to Rethink Ageing   Leave a comment

shutterstock_174024581Today’s shift in thought concerning seniors’ capabilities was pre-empted by spiritual thinker, Mary Baker Eddy, who wrote more than a century ago about “the everlasting grandeur and immortality of development, power, and prestige” which are part of our spiritual being.

These days we hear of Australians in their 80s and older, who compete in major sports events.  And many who are still working into their 70s, 80s and 90s, their occupations varying from cloakroom attendant to running a cancer research centre.

It’s almost as if they think they might live forever!

And why not!  Laugh if you will, but this idea of the impact of what we expect bears a little more consideration It was found in a study that “how we think about ageing” has a greater impact on our longevity than do gender, socioeconomic status, loneliness or how healthy we are.

It couldn’t be a better time for all generations to think more deeply about how perceptions of ageing can have an impact on their health and longevity.  Too many jokes about granny and her walker might just shorten your own life span.

Perhaps we should instead celebrate senior achievers and champion both their accomplishments and the qualities they express.  This may lengthen our lives by planting the idea that their victories over age will be just as attainable for ourselves!

A Journal of Physiology study found, “positive self-perceptions can prolong life expectancy.  Expectations about the inevitability of physical decline with advancing years may be incorrect and that how we age is, to a large degree, up to us.”

If it’s up to us, why not envisage for your older self a life of volunteering or enthusiastic service, increased tolerance and humour, a wealth of experience and the wisdom to tackle any problem.  Cherishing this hope at all ages will tend to lessen any inclination to belittle the elderly.

And understanding why we have grounds for such hope can help avert the wave of panic that might otherwise threaten to wash over us in our 40s or 50s in response to the threat of ageing, or when we come face to face with our own mortality as a result of the loss of a close loved one.

Neurologist Dr Peter Whitehouse, author of the thought-provoking book The Myth of Alzheimer’s,” adds a frequently overlooked aspect to successful ageing.  He describes ageing as our “unique ability to grow spiritually and mentally.”

The way I see it, such spiritual growth is key.  I’ve found that a developing consciousness of our present spiritual nature – made in the “image and likeness of God”, as the Bible puts it – helps to extinguish fears about ageing that grow out of a more material sense of ourselves.

I like how the Bible corroborates the scientific approach of needing to change our expectations, but points to a deeper means for doing so than positive thinking.  It says, “The Spirit alone gives eternal life.  Human effort accomplishes nothing.” (John 6:63)

As we understand this, we might be less enticed by the latest body-focussed fads to reverse the ageing process.

Eddy’s summation in Science and Health gives practical advice, “Life and goodness are immortal.  Let us then shape our views of existence into loveliness, freshness, and continuity, rather than into age and blight.”

Time to review your expectations for the future?

This article was submitted by Kay Stroud who is a life-long Christian Scientist and a writer drawing connections between consciousness, spirituality and health, and trends in that field. 

Follow her blog at www.health4thinkers.com

or follow her on twitter at:  www.twitter.com/KayJStroud

 

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