Archive for the ‘solutions’ Category

Fire on the mountain   2 comments

shutterstock_62922805“Look!” My brother put his arm around my shoulder and pointed beyond the outdoor arena. Willie Nelson had just arrived on stage at the 2000 Mountain Music Fest in Red Lodge, Montana, but the unmistakable plume of a mountain wildfire burst up behind him. A motorcycle had skidded on gravel at high speed and crashed, exploding the gas tank and quickly spreading flames in the tinder-dry grasses and trees at the side of the road (the cyclist survived and mended).

It was late August in a summer plagued by wildfires. Our family’s summer cabin was in the exact spot where the smoke was visible. I raced to a quieter place outside the arena to phone a Christian Science practitioner, since I felt as out of control as the fire appeared to be. I remember saying to him how I couldn’t look at this horrible scene unfolding in front of everyone. Every time I looked at the stage, I was only aware of the fire, which I assumed might be consuming our cabin right then.

The practitioner met my distress with rock solid vehemence, “Don’t you turn away. Look right into that smoke until you can see the face of God.” To me, seeing the face of God meant being able to perceive that God, good was present, right where the evidence of destruction seemed to be. The practitioner reminded me of the time Mary Baker Eddy saw a cyclone coming right toward her home and with amazing firmness and conviction asked everyone in her household to look right at it and realize that there are no destructive elements in God’s creation (We Knew Mary Baker Eddy, Clara Knox McKee, p. 193). The cyclone changed course and headed toward the mountains, doing hardly any damage.

I went back to the concert, but the sight of the raging fire was so overwhelming, I found it difficult to pray. I had been taught to always start with God, so I thought, God is All, which seemed ridiculous in the face of this destructive fire, so opposite to goodness.

Wasn’t it just too late for prayer to change the scene? The fire had already started, worsening by the minute, there was nothing to stop it. How could I see God’s face in any of this? I wondered.

Then I thought of the three young Hebrew men, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego and the fiery furnace they were thrown into. According to the Bible, the fire was heated seven times more than usual, yet the men’s safety was not dependant on the size, shape, placement, or intensity of the fire.

I realized the safety of my cabin and other properties in the area was not dependant on those factors either. God was still there, God was still All, and God was still governing this situation, regardless of its appearance, just as He had for those three Hebrew men. As I continued to insist in prayer that God’s presence and power alone were in control, I began to grasp that if it was possible to be unaffected in the middle of flames in one instance, it was possible in all instances.

Around this time, however, the winds began to pick up from an incoming weather front, blowing new life into the fire and new fear into the crowd. But another thought occurred to me, a variation of the Bible verse from I Kings 19:11: God is not in this wind and God is not in this fire–God IS in the still small voice of Truth. I knew, too, that the Bible says God holds the winds in His fists. I decided I could trust God to control the wind, and not see it as some capricious act of nature with power to destroy.

While all these spiritual ideas calmed me, I still didn’t feel I’d seen the face of God in that fire yet. I began to wonder, if God was not in the wind or fire, but in the still small voice, what was that voice saying to me? These words from the textbook of Christian Science, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, immediately came to mind, “There is no power apart from God. Omnipotence has all power and to acknowledge any other power is to dishonor God.” For me, that was the face of God. I knew in that moment that no matter what else happened or what the results of the fire were, I would not dishonor God by acknowledging another power.

 

Read on to find out how this recognition helped in this situation here

This article was shared by Patti Waddell the Christian Science Sentinel – March 18, 2008

SOLUTIONS THROUGH GRACE   Leave a comment

The editor of The Christian Science Monitor is sharing with us thoughts on grace as the most powerful tool to persuade when appealing to values rather than intellect

 

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                               Daily Lift by Mark Sappenfield  listen to it here

Posted July 2, 2017 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, solutions, Values

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A boulder or a boat? Projects and divine Mind’s direction   Leave a comment

By Mara Purl

When you think about a large project you need to complete, what comes to thought? Do you picture yourself pushing a boulder up a steep hill? Or can you see yourself steering a graceful boat with sails full of wind?

Extraordinary breakthroughs are possible when we get glimpses of God, divine Mind, in operation, and commit to better understanding our relation to Mind.

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I was faced with a huge writing project… So extensive would be the research, so comprehensive the interviews, ….that the whole project seemed overwhelming, and I had no idea where to start. I reached out for help from a Christian Science practitioner, who basically told me that the project was already complete. 

At first, that seemed like the most bizarre thing anyone had ever told me! Of course, the practitioner had a great deal more of substance to say about God and my relation to Him. And as I began to grasp what she was saying, I realized that her bold opening comments would later come to represent a paradigm-shifting idea she was sharing.

Click here to read the entire article from the March 13, 2017 issue of the Christian Science Sentinel

How is it ‘supposed to be’?   Leave a comment

A Christian Science Perspective by Earlene Cox

 

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Several years ago, I placed my house on the market to sell with the brave intent of moving clear across the country. However, months went by and there was no sale. I lowered the price twice, and made some minor cosmetic changes to make the property more appealing. Still there was no sale. Then I wondered if maybe this failure to sell was a “sign” from God that I wasn’t supposed to move after all. But then I thought more deeply about it.

If a student of mathematics has trouble solving an equation, that wouldn’t be a “sign” that the problem isn’t solvable. The student knows that because the principles of mathematics are already established, the solution has already been established. She also knows that she is fully capable of understanding and applying those principles correctly in order to find the right answer.

I realized that the fact that my house had failed to sell just meant that my house had not sold, and that believing that circumstance was a “sign” was superstition. To conclude that each event in our human experience – both good and bad – must have divine authority, is as unscientific as believing that the roll of the dice or the numbers on a lottery ticket are sanctioned by heaven.

It was my deep and earnest desire to understand God differently – not as another name for “fate,” but as the divine Principle at work in my life.

When something hoped for doesn’t happen, have you wondered if it’s because of human fault, fate, or a sign from God? This writer reasoned through to an understanding of underlying cause that gave her peace. Read the full article here:

This article “How is it ‘supposed to be’?” was originally published in The Christian Science Monitor

SPIRITUAL SOLUTIONS   Leave a comment

dreamstime_355292Let us feel the divine energy of Spirit, bringing us into newness of life and recognizing no mortal nor material power as able to destroy.

Mary Baker Eddy, Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures

The Benefits of Fostering

A Daily Lift by Ariana Herlinger

Listen how Ariana learned to foster a more spiritual view of a dog to help find a permanent home for it

Changing course   Leave a comment

By Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche

A Christian Science perspective:  Hope to help heal the destruction and corruption of today can be gained through an inspired change of direction.

Patterns of destruction and corruption are at the heart of many problems today – from the abuse of power in politics to even the conflicts creating famine in Africa. P9290043.JPGAs we look for solutions, much of what’s needed is a change of course. But when answers require a redirection away from destructive behavior, is it reasonable to expect that we can see the change of thought needed for such a course correction?

This question is rooted in the fundamental and timeless inquiry of what we actually are.

 

In this article, “Changing Course“, Michelle explores what it takes to change major values and our perspective from a purely material view to a more spiritual one.  This article was originally published in the CS Perspective feature of the Christian Science Monitor.

Read the whole article:  Changing Course

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