Archive for the ‘Christ message’ Category

The Golden Rule and Peace on Earth   1 comment

by Lynne Buckley-Quirk

Recently I have been feeling deep gratitude for the multitudes who are praying for peace and harmony in the world. Even though cultures, faiths, and traditions may differ, this universal acknowledgment of the effectiveness of praying for peace gives me hope that unity among people and nations is a present possibility, even in the midst of what appears to be chaos, hostility, and polarization. 

My hope that this universal prayer can bring about harmony and unity comes from something I learned years ago—that there is broad agreement about the observation and practice of what is known as the Golden Rule. Today, according to several internet sources, this “rule” is at the core of over ten religions that span the globe. In other words, a very large part of the global community understands that if we want to be treated with fairness, compassion, and equality, we ourselves should treat others that way. 

As a follower of Christianity, I strive to practice the rule as Christ Jesus taught it in his Sermon on the Mount: “Whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them; for this is the law and the prophets” (Matthew 7:12, Revised Standard Version).

Lynne goes on to explain how she demonstrated that unity among people and nations is a present possibility. Click here to read the full article in the Christian Science Sentinel.

Our Prayers Are Still Needed   Leave a comment

Recent events in the United States call on all of us to reach deeper with our hearts to find the power of infinite Love. The world needs all of us right now—needs every prayer that acknowledges the all-power of divine goodness and genuinely desires what is best for all. Evil is not power. It falls in the face of Christlike, spiritual goodness that embraces enemy and friend alike.

Thank you for all you’re doing through your prayers on the frontlines of facing down anything opposed to honor, respect, and dignity of all people. Click below to read a response to this week’s events, “Counteracting chaos and disorder” from the Editors of the Christian Science Sentinel.

Counteracting Chaos and Disorder by Larissa Snorek.

The Real Christmas Message   1 comment

by Allison Phinney

FOR SOME YEARS, just before Christmas holidays, I’d find myself working late at the office downtown. By the time I finally left, stores would be closing, crowds gone, and I’d emerge into a wide, bare urban plaza after dusk. Only a stray business executive or two, carrying home packages from some last-minute shopping, would be hurrying by in the cold.

Without people around, the standard decorations on lampposts and the lighted trees seemed less than cheery—bleak, even. And you couldn’t help feeling there wasn’t a lot in all those tall, grand buildings, now emptied, that could ultimately satisfy the spirit of their daily occupants. Busyness, fleeting prestige, a high income level, wouldn’t do it. Walking along in the darkness, I felt keenly the need all of us have to look elsewhere for the heart and soul of our lives.

Today’s array of holiday festivities offers a temporary sort of warm respite from bleakness. But, interestingly, it is the simple, original Christmas story that still holds the greatest practical promise for lifting the hearts of everyone.

Read the Christmas story as though you’ve come upon it for the first time—not just being swept along by the rhythm and beauty of the language through each of the familiar scenes—and you’ll find it can seem strikingly new. At the heart of the story, of course, are a birth and a baby, usually one of the most hopeful and unselfish of human moments. Who hasn’t felt a rush of pure love and hope for the newest addition to someone’s family! But in this case the child immediately becomes a sign of hope for the world.

From the beginning of the careful account in Luke’s Gospel, the story is clearly about real people, in a real time, in a real place. The journey to pay taxes in crowded Bethlehem has a factual basis. Herod the Great appears in history books. Mary, the mother-to-be, has recognizable concerns and doubts about the message she is hearing, even as she shows a transforming spiritual obedience and love for God. Joseph, her husband, isn’t a naive man, but he consciously loves and trusts Mary’s purity and goodness.

The baby Jesus is born in a stable (some say a cave, where the animals were kept). When the shepherds arrive and relate their amazing experience of God’s light and glory, they apparently already know of this birth. We realize they have been expecting the fulfillment of prophecy regarding a coming Messiah. Obviously, this tiny child is identified with a message of huge dimensions from the very beginning. The shepherds and the wise men and Mary were not mistaken. The child grew up to have meaning for an entire world.

Christ Jesus would teach—and make evident—that God is unlimited good, beyond all previous human conceiving. He would show again and again that this good is in fact never absent, or at some remove from human life, but is in the midst of it as a vital presence and power—literally, “God-with-us.” Through Jesus’ parables and beatitudes, and above all his own example and healings, he would fill people with a new, illumined understanding of life. He would describe himself as “the light of the world” (John 9:5). He would tell others they, too, were light in a dark world—if they received and understood his message that their actual nature is the very expression of God, whom, the Bible describes as Love and Spirit (see Matt. 5:14).

If we yearn for the answer to the bleakness arising out of a material sense of existence, here’s where it’s found—in this light of Christ that outshines all the gloom. And this answer infuses Christmas with a meaning and joy that nothing else can. Mary Baker Eddy, who discovered the nature of Jesus’ original Christianity to be scientific in the most profound sense, wrote of Christmas: “I celebrate Christmas with my soul, my spiritual sense, and so commemorate the entrance into human understanding of the Christ conceived of Spirit, of God and not of a woman—as the birth of Truth, the dawn of divine Love breaking upon the gloom of matter and evil with the glory of infinite being” (The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany, p. 262).

After a major healing experience, which came spiritually, Mrs. Eddy felt her eyes being opened to the true dimensions of Jesus’ life. She began to see how perpetually thinking that matter and its constraints were more definitive, more real in her life, than God, had severely circumscribed her own understanding of Him. After that healing, she gave three years of her life almost exclusively to intensive study of the Bible and to prayer, looking for answers as to how she had been healed. She wasn’t satisfied to believe this was a rare instance of blind faith having an effect on the body. And it hadn’t been. She realized that she was being shown practically that no one’s life has ever been locked into the material existence that seems so real, but that life is actually in and of God, Spirit, regardless of appearances.

Mrs. Eddy linked Christian healing closely to Christmas. She wrote, for example, in her article “The Cry of Christmas-tide”: “In different ages the divine idea assumes different forms, according to humanity’s needs. In this age it assumes, more intelligently than ever before, the form of Christian healing. This is the babe we are to cherish. This is the babe that twines its loving arms about the neck of omnipotence, and calls forth infinite care from His loving heart” (Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896, p. 370).

Each of Jesus’ so-called healing “miracles”—such as the healing of Lazarus, of an epileptic boy, of lepers, and of blind, deaf, and paralyzed people—broke all the so-called rules and laws of a material universe. If these events were merely mysterious exceptions, they couldn’t be repeated. Jesus wouldn’t have taught his disciples the healing power of understanding the God who is infinitely good. He wouldn’t have told them, “Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils: freely ye have received, freely give” (Matt. 10:8).

These departures from material laws actually uncovered the consistent laws underlying existence, which were spiritual, not material. These Christianly scientific laws of being had never changed, Mrs. Eddy realized. They still existed, and on their basis Christian healing could be restored. As she herself came to understand the true nature of prayer, she saw healing after healing take place for those she prayed for.

Mrs. Eddy saw that the most effective prayer excludes fear. Instead, it opens thought to the immense goodness of God, to the perfect divine Principle, Love, rather than asking God to change something. Thousands of students to whom she taught Christian Science learned to heal through prayer and spiritual understanding. Today the same kind of healing flows from this larger view of God.

Healing that comes exclusively through prayer is still widely disbelieved in an intensively materially minded and skeptical society. This atmosphere of human thought acts to distance anyone from the spiritual experience of knowing God. It tends to limit even devoted Christianity. The good news is that even a little unselfish love reopens the door of thought to more of the love and goodness that are at the center of life. But the greater good news is that the entire spiritual universe of God’s goodness, what Jesus referred to as the kingdom of heaven within (see Luke 17:21), is already here—and we are each included in it.

We do need awareness of God in our everyday living—we need to keep growing into the understanding that God is All-in-all, is our Life, now—if we are to feel the naturalness of Christian healing. As Jesus practiced healing, it was more than compassion for humanity, even more than an impressive sign that he’d been given divine authority. It was the actual presence of God and God’s love for His creation—a very new sense of Life—becoming apparent. As the bleak clouds of a material sense of existence, with its sickness, evil, and sadness, break apart, the light of Christ, the true idea of God, pours through. We, too, become more conscious of the good already present. This irresistible effect is what characterizes true healing.

Even though I’m involved daily in the practice of Christian Science healing, I was recently surprised simply to see how many healings I’d been hearing about over a period of only a few months. These were coming along in e-mails, letters, phone calls, and by word of mouth. They came from friends, acquaintances, students whom I had taught in Christian Science classes, and fellow Christian Science practitioners. I realized I’d heard of healings of medically diagnosed cancer presumed to be terminal, of a broken toe, and of a shortened leg. Healings of a long-standing hernia, severe heart problems, concussion, symptoms of cystic fibrosis and of multiple sclerosis, hemorrhaging, psychological problems, and a child’s diagnosed deafness.

Christmas in its true light can’t possibly be overwhelmed by the bleakness of a material existence. The real Christmas message—the healing “Cry of Christmastide”—is telling us of unlimited good, of endless spiritual meaning and love to be learned, giving a new and infinite dimension to the good we have far too tentatively assigned to God. Christmas is, after all, God’s own message to humanity.

Click here to listen to this article or to read it directly from the December 25, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Sentinel.

Allison “Skip” Phinney is a Christian Science practitioner and teacher. He lives in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

All Perfect Gifts are from God   Leave a comment

by Yvonne Prinsloo

At Christmastime I love to recall a Bible verse that is close to my heart: “Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning” (James 1:17).

These words so beautifully express what I’ve learned from Christian Science about the Christly spirit of giving and receiving. When a gift is inspired by unselfish love that stems from an understanding that God is the true source of all good, it brings joy to both the giver and the receiver. 

But not every gift is a good one with pure motives behind it. Sometimes gifts are used as a means of controlling others, and they bring to the receiver not joy but a sense of oppression. 

Before my marriage, I found that my mother-in-law-to-be had a tendency to dominate, and I often sensed there were strings attached to the gifts she gave. For instance, my future in-laws told me that, as a wedding gift, they would like to furnish the one-bedroom flat my husband and I would be moving into. They made a date to join us at the shops to choose the furniture. 

On the surface this seemed to be a generous gift, but instead of feeling grateful, I felt imposed upon. I had been looking forward to furnishing our first home, and I worried that our freedom of expression would be encroached upon. Fear crept in as I thought of how different my mother-in-law’s taste was from mine. She always chose items that were elaborate and pretty, while I preferred things that were plain and tailored.

Yearning to find peace from the turmoil I was in, I turned to God with all my heart. What came to mind was the thought of two trees, an oak and a willow. Because the oak tree has only oak leaves growing on it, and the willow tree only willow leaves, it would be impossible to find even one willow leaf growing on an oak tree or one oak leaf growing on a willow. There is a law that maintains the individuality of each tree.

That made me think of a statement in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy: “The divine Mind maintains all identities, from a blade of grass to a star, as distinct and eternal” (p. 70). 

This calmed my fear. Just as I was certain that trees are individual and distinct, I could trust that God gives His children identities that are individual and distinct. This meant that my mother-in-law and I could not impose on one another’s identity. I realized with joy that our individual expression of God’s qualities is governed by divine Mind and is always safe from interference.

The next day we set out to buy the wedding present. I felt such peace, knowing that God was in control of everything and was maintaining the individuality of each of us. As we looked around the shops, I fell in love with a lounge suite—and to my joy, my mother-in-law liked it as well. We all did! Receiving the gift ended up being a happy experience. 

But soon, I again found myself harboring feelings of indignation at further offerings of gifts from my mother-in-law. They felt like an intrusion in my life and an attempt at control. 

Then one day I read this instruction in Mrs. Eddy’s Message to The Mother Church for 1902: “The Christian Scientist cherishes no resentment; he knows that that would harm him more than all the malice of his foes” (p. 19). 

I had to admit that cherishing resentment was exactly what I was doing, and it was only making things worse. I realized that to find my freedom, I had to let go of this negative attitude. But how? 

Again I turned to God for an answer. I thought about the perfection of God’s creation as described in the first chapter of the Bible, which tells us, “God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good” (Genesis 1:31). Since there is nothing “very good” in being a victim or feeling annoyed, I had to conclude that this attitude did not truly belong to me as God’s child, and I prayed to be free of it. I also saw that God did not make an overbearing person, so I needed to correct my view of my mother-in-law and see her as God’s child, too.

I began to watch my thoughts and actions to make sure I wasn’t trying to manipulate or control others myself. For example, I decided to take each of my three little boys shopping individually when they needed new clothes, and let them choose their own outfits rather than me choosing for them. It was a wonderful experience, as each child picked clothes that suited his individuality. How happy and free we all felt! And how blessed I felt being led and governed by God.

My freedom from resentment toward my mother-in-law came one day when she arrived at our home to celebrate Christmas with us. I started to feel overwhelmed as the gifts being unloaded from the car never seemed to stop coming. They filled the fridges, the shelves, and the cake tins, and it wasn’t long before all my good intentions to watch my thoughts fell by the wayside. Again, I felt imposed upon. 

With a deep desire to be free from the feeling of oppression, I reached out to God for inspiration. Quick as a flash, a question came to me: “What is your mother-in-law’s motive for bringing you all these gifts?” 

Instead of attributing a selfish, controlling motive to her, I reasoned that as the spiritual expression of God, she could be motivated only by love. God was supplying every good thing to her, including right purpose and activity. Therefore, her gifts could bring only blessings. And I certainly did see that she loved us all and loved giving.

At that point, I recognized that these gifts she’d brought would free me from a lot of extra work and enable me to enjoy the holiday with the family. I felt humbled. All resentment faded and was replaced with love and gratitude. What a happy Christmas we celebrated together, just filled with love and joy!

However, there was another lesson I still had to learn. Eventually, instead of buying me gifts, my mother-in-law began giving me money to spend on a present for myself—but she would put a qualification on the gift. “You must buy something that you will remember me by,” she would say.

“Why can’t I buy something without a condition attached to it?” I thought. As I again prayed to find the truth that would free me, I gave deeper consideration to James 1:17: “Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.”

Then I saw my mistake. I had been personalizing gifts—seeing them as things coming from a person. But now I saw that in reality, gifts are not material but spiritual—such as love, joy, peace, harmony—and that the true source of these gifts is God. Since God is good, His gifts could not include one iota of that which is not good, and they could bring with them “no variableness” nor “shadow of turning.” 

With deep gratitude, I understood that my mother-in-law could reflect only Love’s impartial goodness, which supplies all our needs. I felt so released from the false belief that I was reliant on a person rather than divine Principle for what I needed. 

The next Christmas, I took my mother-in-law Christmas shopping, and you will not be surprised to hear that we had a lovely day together, filled with happiness and companionship. As we walked past a carpet auction, I noticed a lovely carpet being auctioned. 

“Isn’t that beautiful!” I remarked. 

“Let’s just watch here for a bit” was her response. 

The next thing I heard was “Gone to the lady at the back!” My mother-in-law had bought me something that I loved. Later she told me it would not have been her first choice, but she was happy that I liked it. Truly, it was God’s gift, and I felt nothing but joy at receiving it.

Now I am a mother-in-law, and I have found freedom when giving gifts by knowing that my husband and I are not the source of supply, the source of good. “All perfect gifts are from above,” as a hymn by L. L. Randall says (Christian Science Hymnal, No. 342). 

How comforting it is to know that the one who gives is not personally responsible for another’s good, nor can the one who gives be depleted as a result of giving. Since all true gifts are from God’s abundant goodness, they bless both the giver and the receiver. And nothing can stop us from receiving what is rightfully ours as the children of God.

Click here to listen to this article or to read it directly from the December 14, 2020 Christian Science Sentinel.

Christmas – It’s All About Love   Leave a comment

Click here or on the lecture tab above to find this and other Christian Science lectures.

Not afraid but not naive   1 comment

photo of man holding an umbrella
Photo by Connor Danylenko 

Many are voicing their fears and worries about the coronavirus. But Christ, ever “voicing good,” is the divine influence that calms our fears, reveals our safety in God, and brings healing to our lives.

I’ve been hearing the same voices many others in society have been listening to – media, government officials, friends. And the focus is pretty constantly the same: coronavirus. A lot of people have learned a new word, and too many of them are afraid of it.

But recently a little phrase has been surfacing in my thought. It’s this: Christ is voicing good, right within consciousness. What an incredible contrast to all the bad stuff I was taking in. It’s clear to me that the source of that more hopeful thought is Mary Baker Eddy’s Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” where she writes, “Christ is the true idea voicing good, the divine message from God to men speaking to the human consciousness” (p. 332).

Now these words weren’t telling me to ignore the difficult things going on in society. But they were assuring me that there was something more going on than all the discussion about contagion. The Christ is the Godlike nature of Jesus that he lived so fully and successfully in his human life. Jesus promised that this Christ always has existed and always will. It speaks to us of God’s goodness and all-power, and of man’s immortal, indestructible nature. And Jesus’ life proved that this “good” voiced by the Christ has a healing and calming influence in our lives. He gave evidence of this again and again as he came in contact with others.

Over a lifetime I’ve seen a wonderful consistency in what Jesus taught. I’ve seen evidence that the Christ can bring a spiritual poise that literally changes our experiences. Changes them in a way that may be unexplainable to the material senses, but is quite understandable to our more spiritual sense.

On a number of occasions, I’ve seen times when everyone expected contagion to take a particular course, and it didn’t work out that way at all. And I’ve experienced times when a kind of mental contagion was stopped in its tracks. Once when a doctor had set some bones after an accident, he explained a number of drugs I needed to take in order to protect myself from potential harm. He described one drug intended to deal with a condition that he said could be fatal. While I certainly wasn’t naive about his warning, my preference was to protect myself with what I had learned about the healing Christ over the years. But his warning remained a little like a contagion from his thought to my thought.

Not too many days later the very condition he had told me about developed. I did something I wasn’t accustomed to doing, and which wasn’t helpful. I looked up the condition in a medical publication. Sure enough, the word “fatal” was prominent in the description. At first, fear tried to take over. But I began to discern the Christ I had come to trust “voicing good,” and soon I felt a spiritual peace and confidence. And within a few days the condition disappeared as I prayed specifically about it.

This voicing of good is a promise to every individual on this planet. In fact, Science and Health also affirms that the Christ is “a divine influence ever present in human consciousness” (p. xi). No one is without access to this healing influence. As we open our hearts to its messages, we recognize that it’s the true and only influence, bringing a calm that changes the course of human discord.

You don’t need to know a lot about the Christ to open your thought to its divine presence and discern the good it is voicing. In fact, when surrounding voices are making their views too prominent in your consciousness, take a moment and acknowledge that Christ is voicing good, and listen for its message right within your mind, assuring you of your safety in God.

This article by Nathan Talbot was published in The Christian Science Monitor’s Christian Science Perspective column 

Christ—no longer an abstraction to me   Leave a comment

shutterstock_85819045In this article the writer tells of her search for a meaningful understanding of what “Christ” means. She found that “the name Christ Jesus signifies Jesus’ Godlike nature”.

She came to see that “Christ is a title that represents the healing power of divine Love” and that this healing power is present for all to experience. It’s like God’s way speaking to us.

Christ is the true idea voicing good, the divine message from God to men speaking to the human consciousness” (Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Healthp. 332).

The author tells of an experience when she suddenly became very ill with no help at hand. In her words: “I remember turning my thought to God as I had done in the past, knowing He was my “very present help in trouble” (Psalms 46:1). I remember very little else because after this I began drifting in and out of consciousness.

At one point I felt as though I were floating below the surface in deep, dark water, with a dim light above. Then a clear thought came to me: “It is the Christ that awakens me from the dream.” It sounded like an internal voice. The thought was so strong that I felt I must repeat these words. Initially, I did so mentally. Then, I felt a divine impetus to say them out loud. It felt impossible to speak, and the resistance to voicing the truth was strong. I just wanted to drift back to sleep. But I was able to open my mouth and whisper the words. And then again, and then once more—this time in a booming voice! The third time I spoke the words, I became fully conscious. I was healed! …

Although I didn’t fully understand at the time what had happened, I did realize that the Christ was not an entity outside of me but an ever-present divine influence speaking within human consciousness.”

Christmas Stillness   Leave a comment

IMG_2950

Stillness

We hear the
angels speak
in a sound
of gentle stillness …
no wind,
no earthquake,
no fire.
Only blessing.

 

 

Posted December 23, 2019 by cscanberra in Christ message, Christmas

Tagged with ,

How the spirit of Christmas will bring ongoing peace to the world   Leave a comment

Most of us will be travelling during the Christmas holidays, even if we’re simply driving to the local mall and negotiating parking. Whichever mode of transport we take, we’ll be affected by the actions of others.

 

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Although travel can be frustrating at times, I’m finding there are always affirmative, upbeat things to notice as we go: the excited faces of children, the courtesy of others, and the patience of parents and travel staff. However, the presence of harmony in human affairs is not something that happens by mere accident, in a universe of chance. It is actually evidence that the underlying power that governs the universe is Love.

 

The birth of Jesus Christ beautifully illustrated that power. Despite threat of harm by King Herod, Love provided for the travellers and the ensuing birth, comfort and care in a very safe and private place.

The more consciously we acknowledge that divine Love is governing us and everyone, the more harmony we will experience, too.

 

Jesus’ profound mission was to make plain our divine nature as “the children of God.” So, whenever we glimpse ours or another’s true nature, we have, in effect felt “the Christ”, “the divine message from God to men…”, as thought-leader Mary Baker Eddy defines the Christ in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures.

 

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That voice speaks to everyone, and at all times of the year. When we have done the right thing instead of the wrong, we have been directed by the Christ. When we have been patient instead of irritable, we have conceded to the dynamism of the Christ. When we have made a sound choice among several tempting options, we have listened to the Christ and we have seen the true love that’s characteristic of Christianity in action. (from The Love and Dynamism of the Christ, G J Barratt)

During the Christmas Season many of us revisit the life of Jesus, who so completely demonstrated this power of the Christ to bring out harmony in everyday life. The wonder of his virgin birth was not an isolated miracle but evidence of a spiritual law in operation that was confirmed by the healing works later evident in his adult life. Today, more and more people are recognising that his life, although unique and especially blessed, points to a way of living and thinking that’s actually available to each of us.

 

Indeed, seeing beyond the limits of nationalism and religiosity to the universal Christ is at the heart of Christianity. Truly supranational, the message of “the Christ,” in Jesus’ words, was for us to be “of one mind,” “love your enemies,” “bless them that curse you,” and realise “the kingdom of God is within you” and within all.

From this viewpoint, we can claim that same spiritual nature Jesus exemplified as ours also, and that of every man, woman and child we meet in our travels this Christmas.

There’s really no secret to experiencing harmony in the carpark, on a long-haul flight or during a family get-together. It may largely depend on how we think of ourselves and others.

 

Version 2

 

Kay Stroud writes on the connection between consciousness, spirituality and health, and trends in that field. She practices Christian Science healing and is the Committee on Publication, spokesperson for Christian Science in NSW, QLD, ACT, NT. Blog: www.health4thinkers.com Twitter: @KayJStroud

Practising Christian Healing, A Lecture by Mary Alice Rose   Leave a comment

 

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Practising Christian Healing

What do you think of when you hear the word Christianity? For some today, Christianity may have negative connotations, or perhaps provoke something other than an entirely positive response. But the Christianity I know—the Christianity I understand that Christ Jesus taught—is a vital, crucial agent for healing in the world.

My heart yearns for people to know what Christianity truly means: To me, it’s so about love. And there is no better example in human history of genuine, unconditional love—and its healing effect—than Christ Jesus’ own life. The love he taught and demonstrated actually transformed lives—so it must have been more than mere sympathy or kindness. It must have been the inspiration of divine Love, God, that enabled him to embrace each individual as the beloved child of God.

Living Christianity is about how we can do the same—how Jesus himself expected us to do the same. He taught that those who followed him by living and loving according to his teachings could heal as he did. And he left us with the promise that spiritual healing is possible for everyone to experience and practice.

At the heart of this healing is love—the true vision of our neighbor which flows from God, Love itself. In this lecture, I’ll share how this love impels us to go beyond our preconceived notions and discover more of each individual’s God-derived nature in order to help others. I’ll also discuss some other ideas basic to Christian Science—which is founded on Jesus’ words and works—that allow any of us to heal and be healed.

My hope is that you’ll be able to walk away from this lecture with the essence of true Christianity in your own heart: love that reforms, transforms, and heals.

 

To hear her lecture, click here

 

Mary Alice tells people that the answer to the question of how she started studying Christian Science is not that interesting: she grew up in it. The more interesting question is why she stays with it, and she loves exploring the answer to that compelling question with others.
Mary Alice’s interest in science and technology led to a 20-year career in different areas of applied physical science. Through those years, her love for God permeated every aspect of her daily work. Whether supporting research by tornado chasers as a meteorologist at the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Oklahoma, making live broadcasts during severe weather outbreaks on NOAA Weather Radio, troubleshooting operational software at sea as an engineer and researcher in underwater acoustics, or co-managing a division of 140 engineers and scientists in development of the ground system for the Hubble Space Telescope, prayer was her constant guiding and motivating force.

As interesting as her career was, Mary Alice found that she wanted more time to focus on her most rewarding scientific endeavor: exploring her relationship with God. So, in 2002, Mary Alice made the transition from manager, engineer, and earth scientist to the full-time ministry as a Christian Science practitioner, where divine guidance continues to be her mainstay as she helps people every day in praying about such challenges as careers, finances, health, and relationships. She is also an authorized teacher of this Science and has had a number of articles published in the Christian Science periodicals.

Mary Alice and her husband live in Brookeville, Maryla

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