Archive for the ‘Christian Science Perspective’ Category

Universal womanhood   Leave a comment

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day, celebrated on March 8, is #PressforProgress. This call for action reminds me of a time when I saw, in a modest way, how each individual can be a part of pressing for, and forwarding, such progress.


It was my first time traveling in a particular country where sexual harassment of foreign women was not uncommon. Our group wanted to respect the customs of modesty for women in this country, so even though it was quite hot during that season, we wore clothing that completely covered our arms and legs. Nevertheless, the harassment occurred.


I have always found prayer to be reliable in addressing challenges, so I turned to God. I wanted to understand more fully the purity of all women and men – a quality that’s part of everyone’s real identity as God’s spiritual idea, or child. In the Bible’s book of Genesis, we read, “Male and female created he them” (1:27).

…..There’s no conflict between these masculine and feminine qualities. In “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” Christian Science discoverer Mary Baker Eddy describes “man” (a generic term for all of God’s children) in part as “the compound idea of God, including all right ideas;…that which has not a single quality underived from Deity” (p. 475).

I was so reassured by this view that God’s pure and perfect creation includes everyone. …..This gave me a conviction that even if someone isn’t being respectful or appropriate, there is a solid basis for a change in course and hope for progress.

We can all take a mental stand for the expression of universal womanhood and manhood in all of us – the right of each man and woman everywhere to express qualities of strength, goodness, and purity. Because that is how we are made!

This article from A Christian Scientist’s Perspective in The Christian Science Monitor by Susan Booth Mack Snipes. To read the full article with the experience she shares, click here

“there are no outsiders”   Leave a comment

Beyond skin color

Today’s contributor reflects on lessons he learned as he prayed about prejudice after moving from Congo to Norway – and how those lessons continue to shape the way he sees others.

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……..My first thought was, “I’m going to deny his request just so he can feel what it’s like to be rejected!” But just as I heard my own answer, I immediately thought, “Of course you’re not going to do that.” From the very first day we’d lived in Norway, my parents had urged us to look past differences, look past color….

One of the biggest lessons it taught me is that we really are all brothers and sisters. The spiritual reality is that we aren’t material beings divided into separate races and living in separate nations; we all live in God’s kingdom – the kingdom of heaven, which Christ Jesus told us is right here, right now. Prayer to better understand God as the true creator of us all can open our eyes to the presence of this kingdom, helping us realize there are no outsiders. No one is outside good, outside divine Love. It isn’t being of the same race or culture that makes us “in” with others. It’s God. It’s knowing that we are living in God’s kingdom as God’s offspring, because that’s God’s truth. This is a very effective way of combating prejudice, because it starts from the basis of oneness, rather than divisions.

So I changed my answer. I began thinking of this individual with love. I thought: “As God’s son, he could never harm me; he can only reflect goodness.”

What if we did this for everyone we met? What if we let God show us the true individuality of each of His ideas – as spiritual, uniquely colorful, and wonderful?

This article from The Christian Science Monitor’s : A Christian Scientist’s Perspective was written by Christian Kongolo. Read or listen to the entire article here

Moving Mountains   Leave a comment

shutterstock_160108343Within the past few years we have seen a tremendous accession of physical power to mankind.  We often hear it said that man now has the power to blast all human life from the earth if he wants to.  His latest achievement, the hydrogen bomb, seems a kind of blasphemous parody on the words of Jesus: “If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you” (Matt. 17:20).

The faith that has rocked the world with atomic explosions is a faith in man’s capacity to control nature through scientific method, but today one often finds it combined with a fearful doubt of man’s ability to control himself.

Christian faith may come to our rescue in this dilemma, but in its usual forms it is far removed from the blazing assurance and unlimited claims of primitive Christianity.  The sharp struggle between religion and science in the 19th century has resulted, for the most part, in a sort of gentleman’s agreement between the two—a state of peaceful coexistence, with the methodologies of science supreme in the practical concerns of life, and religion left to play over man’s interests as a kind of inspirational and institutionalized poetry.

The urgent need of our time is for a coherent view of life, at the same time religious and scientific … Read more …

This article by Robert Peel was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor and later in the Christian Science Sentinel of September 1, 2013.

#MeToo and the potential for healing   Leave a comment

Acknowledging everyone’s true nature as inherently whole can bring freedom and healing, even in the wake of sexual assault or harassment.

Most of those active on social media recently will have seen posts in their feed including the hashtag #MeToo. The #MeToo campaign was started in 2007 by Tarana Burke, in order to help sexual assault survivors. It has trended since Oct. 15, when actress Alyssa Milano invited women to highlight the magnitude of the problem of sexual harassment and assault by using the hashtag and sharing their stories.

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Ms. Burke said that the phrase “me too” was intended as “a catchphrase to be used from survivor to survivor to let folks know that they were not alone and that a movement for radical healing was happening and possible.” I agree. As large as the problem of sexual harassment and assault is, it helps me to remember that the potential for prevention and healing is even more impressive…..

 All of my engagement along these lines is empowered by seeing and loving myself and others as God made us: as God’s spiritual children, composed of indestructible God-given qualities such as joy, peace, and wholeness.

 I am heartened by the support I have received, and by all the prayers, conversations, and actions coming forward as a result of the #MeToo campaign. May it continue. And may we increasingly discover that evil is not inherently a part of anyone, male or female, nor is it the ultimate power. Instead, may all feel the tender but mighty touch of the infinite good that is God – omnipresent, omnipotent, divine Love – that protects us, washes us clean, reforms us, redeems us, and causes us to rise up renewed, in ever fresh and increasing expressions of mutual freedom, blessings, and love.

This article by Susie Jostyn is from a column: A Christian Science perspective in The Christian Science Monitor, to read the full version click here

To read about one of Ms. Jostyn’s experiences and related ideas, check out her article published in the Nov. 7, 2011, issue of the Christian Science Sentinel.


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