Archive for the ‘Christian Science Perspective’ Category

Getting to know our spirituality   Leave a comment

shutterstock_78398836….there’s more to us than that outer crust of surface appearances. We each have a spiritual nature. And there’s more to that spiritual nature than simply an interest in spiritual-type things….Spirituality is actually the fundamental nature of our being.

Beautiful, solid spirituality is palpably within us and all around us; and we can see it when we start looking for it. It’s never enough to be satisfied with what the world says we are. In the realm of divine Mind, we continually shine forth with the glory of God. Our identity as Mind’s spiritual idea is nothing less than glorious, immeasurably cherished by God.

Even a little knowledge of one’s spiritual identity can be helpful in very practical ways. For instance, after a friend of mine woke up feverish in the night, the first thing she did was to begin thinking deeply about her spirituality.

That might sound like a curious thing to do, but experience had shown her that being more conscious of her true nature as God’s child, or spiritual expression, always raises her thoughts into awareness of God’s presence and of what God is doing for her. God, limitless Love itself, is always loving and caring for each of us. And as my friend prayed the following morning, the fever completely left her.  And she saw that her true self is not based in materiality and limitation but in God, Spirit….

As we understand this more and more, it becomes clear that our God-given spiritual being is such a gift. Throughout the day, as we move from task to task, it is actually possible to remain in vibrant awareness of it.

This article by Mark Swinney was published in The Christian Science Monitor, for the full version read it here

Perspicacity and uncommon sense   Leave a comment

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The first time I saw artist René Magritte’s self-portrait “Perspicacity,” I was completely captivated by it. He portrays himself sitting at his easel, studying an egg, yet painting a graceful, fully grown bird in flight. What a powerful depiction of imagination and creativity!

Over the years, I’ve come to realize how Magritte’s painting actually presents even more than that. To me, it illustrates what’s possible when we turn our perception away from mere surface appearances toward more discerning views.

In one dictionary “perspicacity” is defined as “acuteness of discernment or understanding.” I like to think of it as uncommon sense – the ability to rise above the conventional and customary view that would look at an egg and then, well, paint just a replica of the egg.

The teachings of Christian Science encourage the spiritual seeker to consider a sense of reality that is different from – deeper than – what the physical senses present. Mary Baker Eddy, who discovered this Science, describes throughout her primary work, “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” how a spiritual perspective has a practical impact. For example, she says: “A knowledge of the Science of being develops the latent abilities and possibilities of man. It extends the atmosphere of thought, giving mortals access to broader and higher realms. It raises the thinker into his native air of insight and perspicacity” (p. 128).

I’ve often seen how understanding God can and does meet our needs by inspiring thought to appreciate and apply the extraordinary spiritual concepts that God is constantly communicating to us, such as the idea that as divine Love itself, God is the source and sustainer of harmony for all of us.

Think of the possibilities for our world as we each become more conscious of our own and others’ “native air of insight and perspicacity”!

Read the full article from The Christian Science Monitor’s Christian Science Perspective column which includes the author, Kevin Graunke‘s experience of using this kind of ‘uncommon’ perspicacity in his work place here

Sheltered ‘under the shadow of the Almighty’   Leave a comment

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Photo by Tatiana on Pexels.com

He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, “He is my refuge and my fortress; my God, in Him I will trust.” … He shall cover you with His feathers, and under His wings you shall take refuge.
Psalms 91:1, 2, 4, New King James Version

Step by step will those who trust Him find that “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.”
– Mary Baker Eddy, “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” p. 444

To listen to or read more click here

 

Posted September 15, 2018 by cscanberra in Christian Science Perspective

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Harmony and diversity – together   Leave a comment

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In the wake of France’s celebration as two-time champion of the soccer World Cup (1998 and 2018), many are surfing on a wave of optimism that the momentum of hope and pride might help heal economic and social fractures, especially among French youth.

This contrasts strikingly with the feeling that has been expressed by many disillusioned young people, that they don’t really “belong.” But I believe all of us are valuable, throughout all times and despite the distinct geography of our origins, and we can realize this by considering a more universal and spiritual sense of our identity.

Christian Science discoverer Mary Baker Eddy, who founded The Christian Science Monitor with the object “to injure no man, but to bless all mankind,” wrote in her revolutionary book “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures”: “In Science man is the offspring of Spirit. The beautiful, good, and pure constitute his ancestry. His origin is not, like that of mortals, in brute instinct, nor does he pass through material conditions prior to reaching intelligence. Spirit is his primitive and ultimate source of being; God is his Father, and Life is the law of his being” (p. 63).

This approach to thinking about our identity has been expressed in this song in the Bible: “I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well” (Psalms 139:14). As we discover infinite Spirit as the real source of our being, both the origin and purpose of our identity shine forth in their true light, and limitations, including those stemming from our environment or education, fall away.

May the liberating universal sense of spiritual worth that each man, woman, and child is entitled to feel guide our interactions with one another.

Click here to read or listen to the entire article by Myriam Betouche from The Christian Science Monitor’s Christian Science Perspective

Out of the depths of depression   1 comment

P1000397_2.jpgOne night, as I lay in bed marveling at the unusual quietness of the evening, I began to consider some of the things I’d recently read that were gaining traction in my thought. Two that stood out were this beautiful verse from the Bible, “From the end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when my heart is overwhelmed: lead me to the rock that is higher than I” (Psalms 61:2), and a line from Science and Health: “The three great verities of Spirit, omnipotence, omnipresence, omniscience, – Spirit possessing all power, filling all space, constituting all Science, – contradict forever the belief that matter can be actual” (pp. 109-110). I saw that God, the divine Spirit, made us not as defective mortals, but as the spiritual expression of His limitless love.

After a few minutes of pondering these ideas in the darkness, my thought suddenly became startlingly clear. It was as though, without realizing it, I had been held under water for a very long time, when all of a sudden I was unexpectedly released and shot to the surface. For two weeks after, all my waking moments were suffused with an awareness of God’s infinite presence. I felt genuine, boundless joy for the first time in years.

For the entire contribution by Dean Coughtry in a Christian Science Perspective from The Christian Science Monitor listen or read here

Value that’s not contingent on circumstance   Leave a comment

shutterstock_169062386A woman I know spent her early years wishing she’d never been born. She knew she wasn’t wanted from day one. In fact, even before she was born she was referred to as “Calamity Jane.” Her family situation included mental illness, physical abuse, and alcoholism. As an adult, she still felt trapped by the circumstances of her birth……

Imagine her enormous relief when she read these words in the Bible and glimpsed that they were true: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father” (Romans 8:15). This shows that we are all actually children of God. As such, we inherit the characteristics of our divine Parent: we are spiritual, valued, and whole.

The woman came to realize that God, who is good, loves us unconditionally and that our worth isn’t determined by genes or early childhood experiences. And she saw how recognizing these spiritual facts of our existence enables us to live them. Her life turned around, and instead of falling into the same destructive patterns her parents had, she became productive and successful.

The first line of the Lord’s Prayer shows us that God is “our Father.” In Science and Health, there is a spiritual interpretation of this line: “Our Father-Mother God, all-harmonious” (p. 16). A life that expresses harmony because our divine Parent is all-harmonious? Wow! Is such a thing possible? Absolutely!

This article by Deborah Huebsch can be listened to or read in The Christian Science Monitor

 

Trusting God, finding home   Leave a comment

P1000710 Our little condo sold before we had found another place to live. While we were able to make temporary living arrangements and borrow a car, the resulting nomadic and uncertain lifestyle felt deeply unsettling to me. As there were no suitable homes in the city available in our price range, an air of hopelessness began to creep in. Discouraged and a bit frightened, I turned earnestly to God in prayer – something I’d found helpful many times before.

I spent hours carefully reading the Bible, pondering what I read, listening for the mental nudge of God’s direction, and acknowledging His loving care for my family and for everyone. These lines from a favorite hymn in the “Christian Science Hymnal brought me great comfort:

Home is the consciousness of good
That holds us in its wide embrace;
The steady light that comforts us
In every path our footsteps trace.

(Rosemary C. Cobham, alt., No. 497)

 

If consciousness is the true expression of home, as the hymn says so beautifully, I saw that my role was to continue to listen for inspiration and trust God’s goodness, and keep that focus in my consciousness. If my thoughts were filled with qualities such as love and gratitude, I wouldn’t have enough mental space left for worry, which is a form of fear. I’ve found many times in my life that the active expression of love, gratitude, and other spiritual qualities results in transformation both of my mental outlook and of whatever experience I’m going through.

As we continued to pray with these ideas, we felt inspired to put in an offer on a particular home, even though we’d previously made an offer on it that had been rejected. This time, however, the offer was accepted and the sale terms were resolved within just a few days; a month later, we moved in. I was touched by how quickly all this happened and felt it was an affirmation of the power of prayer.

To read the full article from The Christian Science Monitor’s A Christian Science Perspective by Jennifer McLaughlin or to listen to it, click here

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