Archive for the ‘spiritual identity’ Tag

Not ‘What if ‘ Only ‘What is’   Leave a comment

A Daily Lift by Andrea McCormick

In this 3 minute podcast Andrea talks about how she learned to shift thought away from negative ‘What if …’ thinking and start to ask ‘What is the spiritual truth about this situation?’ She recounts how this kind of change in thinking brought about a quick healing.

True Ancestry   1 comment

Man and God Inseparable   Leave a comment

Limitless Worth and Employment   Leave a comment

An article by Lindsey Biggs from the Christian Science Monitor.

Where does our worth come from? A particular job? How much praise we get from a job well done? Many of us have had to wrestle with such questions.

Lindsey writes:

There was a point when I desired additional employment. I felt there were greater ways that my skill set could be used than in what my role at the time offered.

I regularly turn to prayer when I need help or guidance. Prayer gives me a clearer sense of my (and everyone’s) relation to God. I’ve found that getting a clearer view of what God sees and knows helps me experience more harmony.

In this instance, my prayers led me to write a “spiritual resume” – not to share with prospective employers, but to help me think more deeply about where our true worth lies. What I mean by this is I compiled a list of spiritual qualities I felt I expressed, such as patience, creativity, compassion, timeliness, order, self-discipline, etc.

Click here to read, or listen to, this short article where Lindsey explains how a change of thinking from a material to a spiritual basis brought about long-term, satisfying employment.

Our True Lineage   Leave a comment

A Daily Lift by John Tyler

In this 3 minute podcast John talks about how people are often identified by their lineage. Nowadays information from DNA tests is frequently used to find out more about an individual’s identity and health prospects. John refers us to the Bible which tells us that God is our creator, our Father-Mother, and he gives an example of how he was healed of a condition, that was supposed to be inherited, by claiming this divine heritage.

You’re So Good   1 comment

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A Daily Lift by Christopher Bowers

In this 3 minute podcast Christopher talks about how hearing a woman tell her dog that he was ‘So good’ reminded him of God’s love for us and the promise that we are made in God’s image.

Posted October 8, 2021 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, God, Identity, spiritual identity

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Spiritual Being   Leave a comment

When spiritual being is understood in all its
perfection, continuity, and might, then shall man be found in God’s image.

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(Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy p325:13)

Sexism in the Workplace Overcome   3 comments

Whole-souled and Unstoppable

An article by Virginia Anders from the Christian Science Sentinel

In one of my earliest jobs, I worked in a department where I was the only woman, and my colleagues took great delight in telling off-color jokes and making sexist remarks in my presence at staff meetings. My boss thought this was funny and joined in. I didn’t find any of it funny and became increasingly uncomfortable. 

When I applied for a promotion in my department, I was not even interviewed, although I was very well qualified for the position. …

In this article Virginia describes how, by gaining a better understanding of her true spiritual nature she was able to rise above a toxic workplace environment and eventually to say, …

My career went forward, and I eventually became the director of a large department with over a billion dollars of work. I never tried to become more like a man in order to express leadership, and I never felt I needed to compete for anything …

Click here to read the complete article originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel.

The Essential Ingredient for Youth Mental Health   Leave a comment

$ dreamstime_5971679The years between 15-25 are frequently a time of questioning and great discovery, but like many others I found them difficult. I had to deal with chronic disease, failure in my chosen career, a persistent lack of self-worth along with indecision about an alternative career path, and loneliness.

Although never diagnosed, a psychologist would probably have called me depressed.

However, along the rugged path to recovering my childhood inner contentment I found that spiritual activities like prayer, research into some of the world’s most meaningful spiritual writings and participating in church were keeping me sane, mentally motivated, and connected to others in a nurturing environment.

The refocus on unselfish activities gave me a feeling of self-worth again and also contributed to a hopefulness that things would get better. In time, it opened up previously unknown pathways to fulfillment.

Rather than restricting me or quashing my critical thinking, my adolescent research into the spiritual nature of mental and physical health made me realise that what I needed all along was to put into daily practice a growing understanding of my radically awesome relationship to the Divine Being.

To the degree that I acknowledged it, I found that I could actually experience divine Love expressing kindness and unselfishness in me; the divine Mind reflecting intelligence and wisdom in me; the divine Life demonstrating health and wellbeing in me; and so on (ideas from Science and Health by Mary Baker Eddy).

Things started to go right for me again. You could say that I saw “the wilderness and desert begin to blossom as the rose”, an image so beautifully depicted in the Bible.

Perhaps not surprisingly, I ended up more consistently in the right head space with a much better view of myself – and was probably a lot more likeable, as well!

A 2008 study published in Australian Family Physician and written by Dr Craig Hassed, Faculty of Medicine at Monash University in Melbourne, reported that “Spirituality is an important determinant of physical, emotional and social health…”

When commenting on escalating trends in youth mental illness his study suggests that “there may be too little attention being given to the ‘protective factors’ against mental illness, of which, particularly for adolescents, are connectedness and having a spiritual or religious dimension to one’s life” (Hassed, The role of spirituality in medicine, 2008).

It’s heartening to learn that spirituality is acknowledged as central to youth mental health by a growing number of psychologists.

It seems to me that clinicians need to speak to the community more about the benefits of spirituality in the treatment of anxiety and depression, and not just in young people, but for everyone.

A spiritual dimension to life will undoubtedly assist you, whether you’re young or old, as you seek (and find) a better, healthier and happier you. That would be the real you!

This article, by Kay Stroud, has been published in the Sunshine Coast Daily, Lismore Northern Star and Bundaberg News Mail.  Kay is a freelance writer focussing on the undeniable connection between our thinking and our health. 

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