Archive for the ‘Renewal’ Category

Freed from the past   Leave a comment

shutterstock_173792090When I graduated from college, I felt like everything I had known was completely uprooted. The daily structure of school was over. I moved to a new city and started a new job, and many meaningful relationships in my life changed.

 

During this time, I often went running on the beach. I loved the opportunity to appreciate my beautiful coastal surroundings, clear my thoughts, and think about God. But one day while running, instead of feeling inspired, I was hopelessly missing the past. I pitied myself for having to go through such a big change, and wished intensely that everything could’ve just stayed the same.

When I reached the end of the beach, I turned to start running back and saw the prints of my sneakers in the soft sand. That’s cool, I thought. What if, as I run back, I put each step in my previous footprint? It seemed like a fun little game.

To my surprise, I found that doing this was incredibly hard. Running while trying to place each step exactly where it had been on my initial run—well, I could barely do it! I ran awkwardly, my movement uneven and my freedom limited.

That’s when I realized: This was exactly what was happening in my life. Instead of embracing a new path, I was trying to “run” each day in the “footsteps” of the past.

At this moment, a passage from the Gospel of Matthew popped into my thoughts. It’s the one where Jesus says, “Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish: but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved” (9:17).

No wonder everything felt challenging and uncomfortable! I was desperately trying to “put new wine into old bottles.” Instead, I had to be willing to make new footprints—create a fresh path and welcome unfamiliar experiences.

Yet, with each step forward, I’ve remembered how important it is to face newness unafraid and with joyful expectation—and that we can do this because of what we know about the continuity of God’s goodness.

Listen to this Daily Lift by Karina Olsen here

or read the entire article Beating the graduation blues

Posted June 16, 2018 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, Renewal

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It’s never too late to experience healing   Leave a comment

Otama cliff top +When my daughter was still very young, joint problems developed in one of my hands. As the condition worsened and my knuckles became disfigured, I feared that perhaps it was too late to stop the degenerating process that seemed to have taken root.

As this problem emerged, I became very conscious of a spiritual hunger in me that I had been putting to one side for some years in the face of day-to-day life with school, a career, and then family. But I knew the Bible to be a source of healing, so I turned to the words of the prophet Isaiah and found a comforting message of God’s power to meet our need even when a situation seems beyond hope. Isaiah wrote: “He will not break off a damaged cattail. He will not even put out a smoking wick” (42:3, God’s Word Translation).

I thought of a flower blowing in the breeze until its stem is so weakened that the blossom head droops. And I considered a candlewick burnt until only a single plume of smoke remains to indicate the flame that once had been. These metaphors illustrate what would seem to be past saving. And the tendency may be to hasten the seemingly inevitable – to snap off the head of the flower or to quench the last ember.

But renewal is a reasonable expectation when we understand the healing and saving nature of the divine Spirit, God. ……..

At one point I looked down at the disfigurement and said aloud to myself, “That has nothing to do with me.” Nothing had changed physically, but my understanding of my nature had shifted from a material to a spiritual base. When I looked at my hand, it was as if I were looking at a dark shadow made by “a declining sun.” Unafraid, I knew the shadow was without substance or power to harm and would pass off me.

When I woke the next day, my knuckles were perfectly normal, smooth, supple, and painless, restored to normal color and function – in a word, perfect. And in the many decades since, no such symptoms have ever recurred.

The yearning to understand God, the immortal Spirit, as the source and maintainer of us all reveals what it means to be truly and fully spiritual as God’s creation – including experiencing the beauty, grandeur, and fullness of life that we at all times have every right to enjoy.

In order to read the full article by Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche from the Christian Science Monitor’s A Christian Science Perspective and follow the transformation of the writer’s thought, click here

Photo credit: Maggie Johnson

I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall in no wise enter therein” (Luke 18:17)   Leave a comment

shutterstock_169648079One time in a high school class, my teacher handed a student a coin. He told the student to squeeze the coin in his palm very tightly. The teacher then took a five dollar bill out of his pocket and tried to push it into this student’s firmly clenched fist. The teacher tried and tried—but it couldn’t happen. For the whole class, he made a salient point—teaching us in a memorable way that we can’t grasp new concepts while we’re holding tightly onto something else.

In prayer, as in fields of learning and knowledge, an openness and willingness to exchange ignorance for truth always brings big benefits. Christ Jesus surely understood this and encouraged people, not just to be halfway receptive to progress, but to be as totally willing, receptive—and innocent—as little children are. “Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall in no wise enter therein” (Luke 18:17). That’s a very clear-cut way to put it!

Through communion with God we can experience the kind of transformation that is far beyond just a slight shift of direction. It can result in a radical conversion, a 180-degree change of thought, where all of existence is perceived from a different viewpoint—an entirely spiritual perspective.

With the trust and flexibility of a child, it’s rewarding to work with the quality of one’s thoughts, to be willing to release and let go of old concepts.

“A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you” (Ezekiel 36:26).

 

In this article The good worth holding on to  Mark Swinney explains further how with childlike receptivity, this change of thought brings surprising changes and healing. Find it here:

https://sentinel.christianscience.com/shared/view/x9tx296nwo?s=e

 

CHANGE OF CONSCIOUSNESS   Leave a comment

Jesus taught us to walk over, not into or with, the currents of matter, or mortal mind.  He demanded a change of consciousness and evidence, and effected this change through the higher laws of God.

The effect of this Science is to stir the human mind to a change of base, on which it may yield to the harmony of the divine Mind.

 

When understanding changes the standpoints of life and intelligence from a material to a spiritual basis, we shall gain the reality of Life, the control of Soul over sense, and we shall perceive Christianity, or Truth, in its divine Principle.

 

Mary Baker Eddy  (Unity of Good), (Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures)

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Forgiving the unforgivable   Leave a comment

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Daily Lift by Deborah Huebsch

 

Past hurts often need an act of forgiveness. Is it possible and how? Deborah shares from her own experience.

 

Posted April 28, 2017 by cscanberra in Forgiveness, Healing, past hurts, Renewal

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Finding Hope and Peace in the New Year   Leave a comment

shutterstock_158694080A Christian Science Perspective:  Healing Ideas for Overcoming Apprehension About the Future

by Allison J. Rose-Sonnesyn

At the close of a year, it can be beneficial to look back over the preceding months to gain a deeper appreciation of good experienced and lessons learned. Once we have expressed gratitude for our blessings, and identified areas we’d like to improve, we may feel inspired to greet the new year with hope and with the joyful expectation of experiencing more opportunities for goodness and growth.

But what if we are filled with apprehension about the coming year? How can this feeling be overcome, so that we can feel a sense of hope and peace?  Read more

Finding Hope and Peace in the New Year was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In it Allison describes how she managed to find hope, a sense of well-being and an expectation of good in thinking about her future and prospects for the new year.

Making Room for New Growth   Leave a comment

Woman picking strawberriesA Christian Science Perspective:  Start by weeding out unhealthy thoughts

by Jan K Keeler

It just kept coming! I was in my yard and noticed some dead wood in a small bush. As I wrestled with the lifeless branches that didn’t want to let go, I was astonished at just how much of it had accumulated in that one tiny bush. But when I cleaned it all out, the bush had more light, more air circulating, and more room to grow.

With discussions about resolutions in the New Year, I think back to that little bush.  It has since flourished and now takes up prominent space in our landscaping.  It serves as a reminder of how important it is to clean out the old, nonproductive, and negative thoughts that are taking up space in our consciousness.  A list of dead wood thinking could include thoughts like resentment, grudges, cynicism, hatred, fear, self-justification, pride, and rumination.  Such thinking stifles our inspiration, crowds out new fresh ideas, and hinders our ability to feel and express love – to experience all the joys and fullness of life.  But weeding out these old thoughts may feel easier said than done.  They may have become so habitual that they feel intertwined permanently into our consciousness and behavior. Read more

Making Room for New Growth was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In this article Jan Keeler talks about how the quality of our thinking is so important in determining the quality of our experience.  Jan emphasises he place of spirituality in thinking that promotes wellbeing. 

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