Archive for the ‘Love’ Category

Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men   1 comment

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$ dreamstime_10813042This recording is of the readings, on the topic, Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men, which formed part of the Testimony Meeting in Canberra on Wednesday 13 December.  Citations were taken from the Bible (King James version) and from the textbook of Christian Science, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

The title of the readings is taken from hymn 310 from the Christian Science Hymnal:

Sing, ye joyous children, sing. / Glorious is the Christ, our king, / Truth has come again to earth, /  Through the lowly Saviour’s birth. / Men and angels, anthems raise;  / Hymns of joy and shouts of praise. / Hear th’ angelic song again: / Peace on earth, good will to men. / Sing, ye joyous children, sing, / Glorious is the Christ, our king.

If you are in Canberra on any Wednesday please join us at 6.00 pm – our Testimony Meetings are open to everyone.  We are located on the corner of Macquarie and Bligh Streets, Barton in the ACT.

Deeds of love   Leave a comment

‘To love is to live’

Have you ever been touched by some act of lovingkindness so pure and genuine, so heartfelt and unselfish, that no words could describe its effect on you? Millions of such acts go on each day, hidden from the world, done quietly, persistently, 

 

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and sometimes at great personal cost or risk to those doing them. Such acts are rooted in the understanding, even in a small degree, that pure love underlies our very reason for existing. To love is to live, in a sense. Our lives are measured more by what we do than by what we say, and rise in the degree that we subordinate self-interest to the interests of others. Such love is the reflection of divine Love, God.

Such acts are rooted in the understanding, even in a small degree, that pure love underlies our very reason for existing. To love is to live, in a sense. Our lives are measured more by what we do than by what we say, and rise in the degree that we subordinate self-interest to the interests of others. Such love is spiritual, the reflection of divine Love.

One of the most profound and inspiring statements on the need for love to be expressed in heartfelt deeds was made by a man who had previously indulged in hatred and violence against a new religious sect springing up in ancient Israel. He was Saul of Tarsus – a brilliant Jewish scholar and lawyer who participated in ruthless assaults against the followers of Christ Jesus, after he had been crucified. And yet, one day, quite suddenly, Saul experienced a dramatic conversion. Temporarily blinded, he found shelter and eventual healing of his blindness from the very people he had been trying to destroy. Remarkably, he went on to become a great healer and Christian leader.

In his brief essay on the subject of “charity,” or spiritual love toward mankind, which has touched millions through the centuries, Saul, whose spiritual transformation earned him the new name Paul, establishes the ascendancy of genuine love over mere words or showy displays:

Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal…. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth; beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Charity never faileth … (I Corinthians 13:1, 3-8)

To express even a few of these characteristics of love toward others may seem like a tall order. But I find it encouraging to remember that deeds of compassion and kindness in the lives of many noble individuals have sprung up, phoenixlike, from the ashes of falsehood and ignorance. And in moments of prayer, when I’ve been especially clear that the love I express originates not in me, but in divine Love, my true spiritual source, it’s as though a veil is lifted from my eyes, so to speak, and I glimpse something of divine Love motivating me and working through my actions. I’ve seen the love that “never faileth” heal what appeared to be a crushing sense of grief or loss – and I’ve also seen it evaporate hatred and ill health. Hatred and discord simply can’t abide within the atmosphere of infinite Love, the all-present and all-powerful divine Spirit, or God. The discoverer of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, once wrote: “Heaven’s signet is Love. We need it to stamp our religions and to spiritualize thought, motive, and endeavor” (“Christian Healing,” p. 19).

Like Paul, we can yield to Christ, the true idea of Love, and awaken to a greater clarity of purpose and a desire to love more unselfishly. And we’ll feel pushed by Christ to go beyond words – to better deeds of love. That’s genuine living.

 

You can support diversity without fear   Leave a comment

“Scientists have made a powerful discovery that appears able to improve everyone’s life. Reports indicate it works on individuals, families, communities, economies, and nations. Interestingly, it appears that too little of this substance may explain the coarsening of language and the hardening of hearts so evident in politics and the media. Lack of it also might be responsible for everything from substance abuse to the anxiety many people say they feel despite the unprecedented security, better health, and affluence the world is experiencing. And here’s the kicker: It’s free, it’s abundant, and you can’t overdose on it.” (John Yemma, Christian Science Monitor)

And the often disregarded, but indispensable substance?

Brotherly love!

Evidence of this love is discovered in quiet acts of empathy and encouragement demonstrated by caring people from all walks of life. For instance, the mature gent in the queue at the supermarket checkout who steps up to pay the balance for the mother of two pre-schoolers who is caught short. Or the young female social media whiz who creates social change through her dedication to affirming the good while gently dismantling prejudice.

 

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Then there’s the hospice chaplain offering simple words of comfort and walking a patient or family member through a process that aims to help them find meaning according to their own faith, or no faith.

Brotherly love, you could say, is at the heart of chaplaincy, pastoral care and spiritual services. But chaplains are not alone in wondering how extensively they need to demonstrate that care.

That was the question asked at last year’s Spiritual Care Australia Conference. Practitioners representing the world’s major faith traditions, as well as many others, who work at the coalface in hospitals, hospices and prisons came together to grow in their understanding of how best to meet the needs of the diverse groups of people they encounter day-to-day, and to better relate to them and celebrate them.

Just as the broader community are questioning stereotypes and thinking differently about ethnicity, culture, faith, race, nationality, skin colour, age, sexuality and gender, spiritual carers are also challenged by new paradigms. Armed with a similar acknowledgement of a higher power as man’s common source, these carers have something in their toolbox that can help them prayerfully reconsider sincerely held beliefs that might prevent them from embracing diversity wholeheartedly.

In the Christian faith, diversity is championed by its followers. “Each person is given something to do that shows who God is: Everyone gets in on it, everyone benefits. All kinds of things are handed out by the Spirit, and to all kinds of people! The variety is wonderful:” (I Corinthians, The Message)

Hearing the heart-felt stories of individuals representing the transgender, LGBTI community, as well as Multifaith and multicultural communities, greatly enhanced my empathy and compassion for those in the community who have different stories to tell.

In the wider community we may well seem to be different—by reason of race, gender, culture, nationality. But this is a limited view of how to see ourselves and others, when we judge identity from a predominantly material perspective. Beyond that, I’ve learned, we each have a spiritual sense through which we can more deeply feel and experience kinship with others as the offspring of the multifaceted, divine Spirit, and not formed after the pattern of mortal personality, passion and tribalism (as explained in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures).

Divine qualities and ideas are as infinite as their divine Source and so it stands to reason that they can be expressed in an endless variety of ways; yet never deviating from Spirit’s pure and good nature. In fact, we can’t help but express kindness, forgiveness and respect to everyone, as we learn that each individual uniquely reflects divine Love itself. And governed by this Love, we aren’t just safe in relation to one another; we can welcome ever more constructive and beautiful relationships with a broader array of fellow citizens.

The brotherly regard that can be offered at the supermarket, on social media or in the sickroom might best follow the principles of interfaith dialogue: to love our neighbor, regardless of their faith…culture… race…gender practices, and to build not just tolerant relationships, but respectful ones.

The writer of this article, Kay Stroud is working for the Christian Science Committee on Publication for Northern-Eastern Australia. More from this writer: www.health4thinkers.com

This article was first published on the Sunshine Coast Daily.

LOVE FOR ALL MANKIND   Leave a comment

The Commitment to love  

These words from a poem by Robert Burns, “Man’s inhumanity to man / Makes countless thousands mourn,” describe how hearts everywhere felt when they heard the news last month of a group of teens who taunted and laughed as they watched a man drown, doing nothing to help. Turning to prayer, contributor Judy Cole was reminded of Christ Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan, which so clearly illustrates Jesus’ words: “This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you” (John 15:12). To love – to be filled with a spiritual and pure love for our neighbor in a world where hate seems prevalent – is the only genuine way to contribute to the lessening of hate and brutality in the world. As the children of God, nothing can stop us from loving in such a powerful and healing way.

What is it that enabled Jesus to love despite the heinous treatment he witnessed against others and

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that was directed at him? His works point to the profound understanding he had of God as divine Love itself, infinitely more powerful than all the hatred he encountered.

The founder of The Christian Science Monitor, Mary Baker Eddy – who faced much injustice in her life – once wrote: “I will love, if another hates. I will gain a balance on the side of good, my true being. This alone gives me the forces of God wherewith to overcome all error” (“Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896,” p. 104).

Read the full article from The Christian Science Monitor’s : A Christian Scientist’s Perspective by Judy Cole here

Healing through Love   Leave a comment

shutterstock_100804129GOD IS LOVE           GOD IS LOVE         GOD IS LOVE

In this Daily Lift, Chet Manchester shares how a moment of realizing the presence of God’s Love changed everything

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Posted July 31, 2017 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, Healing, Love, Prayer

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Love is Powerful   Leave a comment

 

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Deborah shares with us a powerful solution that dissolved a scary situation through the power of brotherly love.

 

 

 

 

 

Listen to this Daily lift by Deborah Huebsch:

“Dinner” with the enemy   Leave a comment

By Jenny Sawyer

My group of friends and I really didn’t like the way this one girl was acting. She was rude, and she put others down to make herself look good. She’d also singled me out for particularly bad treatment. …

IMG_1310Even though Christ Jesus lived two thousand years ago, I still think of him as my go-to expert on relationships. So in considering how I could think more constructively about this girl, maybe even learn to love her, I took a look at the New Testament in the Bible to see how Jesus treated people who weren’t behaving their best. What I noticed was that Jesus willingly spent time with these individuals whom the Bible calls “sinners.” He even had dinner with them!

Are we willing to sit down, really take the time, and be witnesses to the God-created, good, spiritual nature in those we feel we dislike, even despise? I’ve taken to inviting one person each day to dinner—metaphorically speaking—be it an authority figure I’m unhappy with, or someone I feel hasn’t treated me very nicely. Then, in that quiet place of prayer, I sit with my concept of them until it’s polished, transformed….

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