Health you can never lose   Leave a comment

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 “It might seem perfectly logical to say that health resides in one’s physical body— that it’s a kind of personal possession. I caught a clearer glimpse of these concepts when I was watching a sunset recently.”

 

Listen to Chet Manchester’s Daily Lift to hear his insights that came to him about a different kind of health here

 

Posted August 11, 2018 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, Health

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Sunday School saved me   Leave a comment

Playing Guitar      When I was a teenager, my mother passed on and my father remarried. Adjusting to this was very difficult for me, and I descended into depression. The problem was not diagnosed, as it rarely was in those days, but I struggled with a great sadness that led to reckless behavior.

Living in a large cosmopolitan city, I found many opportunities to put myself in harm’s way. Nights often found me wandering alone, and it was easy to get lost in the city and meet people who would take advantage of a lonely girl. … More often than I care to recall, I put myself in dangerous situations, basically asking, waiting, for something to happen.

Only recently have I realized, with deep gratitude, how remarkable it is that I never met with violence during those wilderness years or fell victim to any unsavory behavior. Neither was I lured into the common pitfalls of drinking, smoking, or doing drugs. I credit Christian Science for this protection, because during this period I was attending a Christian Science Sunday School.

I loved the concept of God as both Father and Mother, from whom I could never be separated.

Looking back on my first experience of the Sunday School some years earlier, I remember seeing the words in golden letters high on the wall, “God is Love.” These words were simple and immediate, and I could grasp them. Thus began a growing understanding of God as divine Love and of my own identity as a spiritual idea of Love. The God I was learning about was not wrathful or punishing, but tender and caring.

And a new understanding of man—of myself and of everyone—as God’s perfect reflection gave me hope. This was not a view of man as a condemned sinner, but as the pure and innocent child of God.

I didn’t grasp much of Science and Health at first, but when I found sentences that spoke to me, I clung to them. For example, …“To those leaning on the sustaining infinite, to-day is big with blessings” (p. vii). However tenuous my grasp of Christian Science seemed at that point, it was an anchor for hope, a possible way out of the disarray and fear I felt.

With continued prayer and growth in Christian Science, the relentless despair gradually lost its grip on me, and my careless behavior stopped as well.

When I think of those wandering years now, I’m reminded of Psalm 139: “Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me” (verses 7–10).

 

Sunday School – Nurturing Qualities that Make the World a Better Place

All are welcome in our Christian Science Sunday School in Canberra which is located on the corner of Macquarie and Bligh Streets in Barton and operates from 10.00-11.00 am every Sunday.

 

Hold On   Leave a comment

P1000937From the wreckage of a ship lost at sea one night, a young sailor managed to swim to a great rock jutting out from the ocean not too far away. In the morning he was able to swim from it to the shore.

Later he was asked, “Weren’t you trembling with fear out there on that rock all that night, with the winds howling and the waves crashing and foaming all around you?”

And the young man answered, “Yes, sir, I was, but the rock wasn’t! And I knew that as long as I clung to the rock, I was safe.”

Throughout the ages “rock” has been a symbol of strength and security. The Bible refers to it again and again. In a song of thanksgiving the Psalmist exults, “The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust.”1

In the parable with which he closes his Sermon on the Mount, Christ Jesus tells us: “Whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock.”2

In the Glossary of Science and Health Mrs. Eddy gives as the spiritual sense of this biblical image: “Rock. Spiritual foundation; Truth.”3 All through her writings runs the conviction of the presence and permanence of this spiritual foundation of eternal Truth, to which each of us can confidently and steadfastly cling, and upon which we can build enduring lives of love and service. The winds and waves of human experience, of pain and fear, of poverty and war, may beat and shock; but the rock, Truth, stands forever sure, our fortress and our strength.

Being steadfast is really a glory in itself. No condition, past, present, or future, can withstand Truth.

As we hold fast to Truth, as we love it and live it, we will find our consciousness of good enlarged, our days “big with blessings,” our steps safe and secure, our lives strong and beautiful. We will be steadfast.

To read the entire article “Be Steadfast” by Jeanne Roe Price find it here

Posted July 28, 2018 by cscanberra in fear, Resolutions

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Out of the depths of depression   1 comment

P1000397_2.jpgOne night, as I lay in bed marveling at the unusual quietness of the evening, I began to consider some of the things I’d recently read that were gaining traction in my thought. Two that stood out were this beautiful verse from the Bible, “From the end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when my heart is overwhelmed: lead me to the rock that is higher than I” (Psalms 61:2), and a line from Science and Health: “The three great verities of Spirit, omnipotence, omnipresence, omniscience, – Spirit possessing all power, filling all space, constituting all Science, – contradict forever the belief that matter can be actual” (pp. 109-110). I saw that God, the divine Spirit, made us not as defective mortals, but as the spiritual expression of His limitless love.

After a few minutes of pondering these ideas in the darkness, my thought suddenly became startlingly clear. It was as though, without realizing it, I had been held under water for a very long time, when all of a sudden I was unexpectedly released and shot to the surface. For two weeks after, all my waking moments were suffused with an awareness of God’s infinite presence. I felt genuine, boundless joy for the first time in years.

For the entire contribution by Dean Coughtry in a Christian Science Perspective from The Christian Science Monitor listen or read here

Prayer as listening   Leave a comment

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What’re the thoughts you listen to most?

Is it the endless chatter of our thought or can we learn to listen to a voice that is the underlying voice of all Life?

 

Prayer is a very individual thing, but in its holiest form, it is communion with God. Often the most uplifting prayers are those where we humbly listen. God is divine Mind, and He is always communicating with His ideas—man and the universe. He is always here, ready to guide and guard a willing heart. But to hear Him, we may need to improve our listening.

I have had many healings by standing mentally still and listening to God. When a specific need comes up, such as when a belief of illness or accident presents itself, I usually find the human situation is making a number of claims that God, good, is not the only power. It is important to recognize and dismiss these false claims as erroneous, so they don’t take over and make us fearful. We do not need to accept these suggestions.

Silencing this mental chatter prepares us to hear God’s Word. It is like tuning a radio—eliminating the static of mortal mind so the message of divine Mind is loud and clear.          

One afternoon we noticed that Jordan, one of our three hens, was lying on the ground in a strange position, looking lifeless. As my husband picked her up, she was limp in his arms, and he said sadly, “I think she’s dead.” 

But, just then I saw her eye blink open and close again. My husband had been about to go to the hardware store, so I said, “Just leave her with me.” He carefully placed her in the nest box, and I headed inside to pray. 

When we silently hunger to know God better, this state of mind is ready to be filled with divine inspiration.

I found myself wondering if she was about the right age to die. But straightaway I saw that to think this way was to accept the belief that life is in a mortal body that at some point wears out, and that death is inevitable. Christian Science teaches that in reality, life is not a timeline that unavoidably comes to an end. Life is a synonym for God—without beginning and without end. 

The next thought that came to me was that chickens just die sometimes, for no apparent reason. Again, I rejected this, reasoning that because Life is God, Life is also divine Principle. Life is the law—unchangeable and eternal. There are no creatures that are vulnerable to happenstance. Life is not at the mercy of a mortal body. 

The third suggestion that came was that chickens are difficult to heal—I had failed with chickens before. But I knew that God never fails, so I reasoned that I, as God’s reflection, could not fail either. In divine Mind there is only present perfection, now. 

I dismissed all these erroneous suggestions as I was walking back to the house. By the time I stood in the living room, the chatter of false beliefs had stopped, and I turned to God. I asked God, “What do you want me to see here?” I listened, and immediately the thought came to look at Jordan not as a mortal creature, but as one of God’s perfect, spiritual ideas. Since God is All, His expression is everywhere, and there is, in reality, nothing else to see. 

And so, standing in the living room with my eyes closed, I obeyed. I thought of Jordan and saw (acknowledged) her as a spiritual expression of God. I saw all the lovely things I knew about her and her little quirky ways. She was beautiful. She had an identity that was unique and perfect. I was so filled with what God was teaching me that I totally forgot about the chicken body that was out in the nest box. 

About an hour later, my husband and I were out in the back garden again, and there, digging in the dirt, were three chickens, all happy and busy. A bit later I watched Jordan joyously stretching up her neck and flapping her wings—with no trace of a problem, and no recovery process. We rejoiced: “I will look unto the Lord; … my God will hear me” (Micah 7:7). 

Nowadays I know not to accept the chatter of false belief as my thinking. I simply know that suggestions of fear, disease, or any inharmony are not my thoughts because they are not from God, and I counter them with Godlike thoughts. When I stand as a porter (see Science and Health, p. 392) and bar these thoughts, I am ready to hear the Word of God. I would not have learned these lessons if my prayer had been one of me doing the communicating. God is the one with the answers. 

 

There is more to the story about Jordan and another deeper aspect to it, so carry on reading this writing by Deborah Packer here.  This article was originally published in the March 2018 edition of the Christian Science Journal.

 
 
 

Inspiration in the Night   Leave a comment

$ Star of Bethlehem

Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night with worrying thoughts?

Listen how Susan Brightman from Boulder, Colorado, USA found her peace in this Daily Lift

listen here

Posted July 7, 2018 by cscanberra in Daily Lift

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‘I don’t know how to pray’   Leave a comment

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What prayer is: For me, prayer is drawing close to the creator of the universe. It means getting intimate with God. It is an ongoing exploration of infinite spiritual space and ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

The how-to: Mary Baker Eddy, the Discoverer of Christian Science, devotes an entire chapter to the subject of prayer in her textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. There we read, “Desire is prayer; …” (p. 1)…. Prayer is a yearning thing. An openness to the divine source of all good. Once we’re in that place of genuine openness, there are many ways to continue with prayer. Here are a few.

 

The prayer of petition: The Lord’s Prayer is a great example. In this prayer, Jesus instructs us to ask—to ask for grace, for our daily bread, for forgiveness, and to not be led into temptation.

In addition to the Lord’s Prayer, my daily prayer also includes asking God to guide me, to open my eyes to more of His goodness, to show me what it is like to be Her daughter, to teach me how to love Him and His creation more, and so on.

The prayer of affirmation and denial: This can also be called the prayer of “argument.” It is affirming God’s presence and power and denying the reality of anything unlike God, good.

The prayer of listening: Listening means learning to be silent so we can have what Mrs. Eddy calls “audience with Spirit” (Science and Health, p. 15). We silence the world’s chatter and open our hearts and thoughts to hear the ideas God, Mind, is imparting to us.

The prayer of gratitude: Sometimes just being grateful puts us in rapport with the Divine, or at least begins to. Gratitude tends to shift our attention away from whatever problems we’re facing toward an awareness, and even a conviction, of the allness of God.

The prayer of yielding: This is a wordless surrender, a “God, You take over” prayer. Yielding involves complete trust in God and a letting go of any sense of ourselves as separate from Him.

 

To read the entire article on ‘How to pray” by Deborah Huebsch click here

Posted June 30, 2018 by cscanberra in Prayer

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