Archive for the ‘CS Perspective’ Category

How is it ‘supposed to be’?   Leave a comment

A Christian Science Perspective by Earlene Cox

 

 

P1010665Several years ago, I placed my house on the market to sell with the brave intent of moving clear across the country. However, months went by and there was no sale. I lowered the price twice, and made some minor cosmetic changes to make the property more appealing. Still there was no sale. Then I wondered if maybe this failure to sell was a “sign” from God that I wasn’t supposed to move after all. But then I thought more deeply about it.

If a student of mathematics has trouble solving an equation, that wouldn’t be a “sign” that the problem isn’t solvable. The student knows that because the principles of mathematics are already established, the solution has already been established. She also knows that she is fully capable of understanding and applying those principles correctly in order to find the right answer.

I realized that the fact that my house had failed to sell just meant that my house had not sold, and that believing that circumstance was a “sign” was superstition. To conclude that each event in our human experience – both good and bad – must have divine authority, is as unscientific as believing that the roll of the dice or the numbers on a lottery ticket are sanctioned by heaven.

It was my deep and earnest desire to understand God differently – not as another name for “fate,” but as the divine Principle at work in my life.

When something hoped for doesn’t happen, have you wondered if it’s because of human fault, fate, or a sign from God? This writer reasoned through to an understanding of underlying cause that gave her peace. Read the full article here:

This article “How is it ‘supposed to be’?” was originally published in The Christian Science Monitor

Changing course   Leave a comment

IMGP7100.JPGBy Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche

A Christian Science perspective:  Hope to help heal the destruction and corruption of today can be gained through an inspired change of direction.

Patterns of destruction and corruption are at the heart of many problems today – from the abuse of power in politics to even the conflicts creating famine in Africa, as broadly discussed in a recent Monitor story (“UN says 1.4 million African children at risk in famine: Why there’s still hope,” Feb. 21, 2017). As we look for solutions, much of what’s needed is a change of course. But when answers require a redirection away from destructive behavior, is it reasonable to expect that we can see the change of thought needed for such a course correction?

This question is rooted in the fundamental and timeless inquiry of what we actually are.

 

In this article, “Changing Course“, Michelle explores what it takes to change major values and our perspective from a purely material view to a more spiritual one.  This article was originally published in the CS Perspective feature of the Christian Science Monitor.

Read the whole article:  Changing Course

What is Truth?   Leave a comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACS Perspective by Keith S. Collins

It seems to have become a truism that Americans are living in parallel universes. What passes for truth on the “left” of the political spectrum becomes distortions or even lies on the “right.” And, of course, vice versa.

Large groups holding passionately to opposing versions of truth is clearly unsustainable for a country that wants to live in peace. Can anything be done to help bring order to the situation? From my own experience, I believe what’s needed is spiritual insight … Read more …

This article, What is Truth?, was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.

Hearing the ‘Still Small Voice’ in the Face of the Storm   Leave a comment

shutterstock_78699079A Christian Science perspective:  Praying for safety during stormy weather.

by Allison J. Rose-Sonnesyn

On a cross-country move several years ago, a friend and I were driving across South Dakota when a weather report announced that a massive supercell thunderstorm was right behind us, following our route to the hotel we booked part way across the state.  The situation was quite serious, as tornadoes were expected to accompany the storm, and we were very exposed.

For a few moments, I felt afraid.  But I have learned through my study of Christian Science that as children of God – which all of us are – we are never truly helpless.  … Read more …

In this article, Hearing the ‘Still Small Voice’ in the Face of the Storm, Allison describes the prayer that brought a sense of peace and safety during a dangerous storm.  This article was originally published in the CS Perspective feature of the Christian Science Monitor.

Soaring in 2017   Leave a comment

shutterstock_115098268A Christian Science Perspective:  Spiritual Vision – and Holding to that Vision – is the Key to Progress

by Laura Clayton

DECEMBER 27, 2016 —My plane had left the gate and was taxiing to the runway, passing row after row of other jetliners preparing for takeoff.  Looking out the window, I was impressed by their massive engines and wingspans.  I couldn’t help but think of the Wright Brothers’ first engine-powered flight on Dec. 17, 1903.  The record-setting flight that day lasted a mere 59 seconds – but it opened the door to the amazing future of human flight.

The Wright Brothers held steadfastly to a vision of what was possible.  As this new year begins, perhaps that can inspire each of us to ask what kind of vision we can hold to that will best promote progress and spiritual growth.

For me, the vision begins with another flight image, a verse from the Bible, speaking of God’s protective guidance: “As an eagle stirreth up her nest, fluttereth over her young, spreadeth abroad her wings, taketh them, beareth them on her wings: So the Lord alone did lead him, and there was no strange god with him” (Deuteronomy 32:11, 12).  This speaks to me of the strong, mothering power and presence of divine Love, our divine Parent.  “God is love,” wrote St. John, one of Christ Jesus’ disciples (I John 4:8).

As the spiritual offspring of Love (see Psalms 100:3), we each have a substantial, intact, precious relation to our Father- Mother.  A heartfelt desire to become more aware of God’s provision and care for His children, of Love’s ever-presence, can serve as a spiritual vision that moves us forward. Read more

This article, Soaring in 2017, was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In it Laura explains how holding to her true identity as a child of God opened up new views of life and prepared her for significant progress.

A Year-Round Prayer and Promise   Leave a comment

dreamstime_355292A Christian Science perspective:  The promise of Christ isn’t just for Christmastime

by Susan Kerr

A loved Christmas carol reminds me of one of my favorite messages – the message of God’s tender love for us all, which is not just for Christmas, but brings healing and inspiration year-round.

The carol starts out by mentioning the stillness of the “little town of Bethlehem,” and there’s a quiet awe that comes through.  One version of this carol ends:  “Where meekness will receive him, still / The dear Christ enters in” (Phillips Brooks, Christian Science Hymnal No. 222).

To me, this is both a prayer and a promise.  When we’re meek and receptive, we can feel that message of the Christ showing us God’s tender love, which Christ Jesus so fully expressed.  It comes to our thought and uplifts us.  And this isn’t just true for a few; all have the opportunity to avail themselves of this great gift of the Christ.

How do we “unwrap” this gift through meekness?  Read more

This article, A Year-Round Prayer and Promise, was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In it Susan talks about how adopting an attitude of meekness opens thinking to new ideas and blessings.

Finding Hope and Peace in the New Year   Leave a comment

shutterstock_158694080A Christian Science Perspective:  Healing Ideas for Overcoming Apprehension About the Future

by Allison J. Rose-Sonnesyn

At the close of a year, it can be beneficial to look back over the preceding months to gain a deeper appreciation of good experienced and lessons learned. Once we have expressed gratitude for our blessings, and identified areas we’d like to improve, we may feel inspired to greet the new year with hope and with the joyful expectation of experiencing more opportunities for goodness and growth.

But what if we are filled with apprehension about the coming year? How can this feeling be overcome, so that we can feel a sense of hope and peace?  Read more

Finding Hope and Peace in the New Year was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In it Allison describes how she managed to find hope, a sense of well-being and an expectation of good in thinking about her future and prospects for the new year.

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