Archive for the ‘CS Perspective’ Category

LOVE FOR ALL MANKIND   Leave a comment

The Commitment to love  

These words from a poem by Robert Burns, “Man’s inhumanity to man / Makes countless thousands mourn,” describe how hearts everywhere felt when they heard the news last month of a group of teens who taunted and laughed as they watched a man drown, doing nothing to help. Turning to prayer, contributor Judy Cole was reminded of Christ Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan, which so clearly illustrates Jesus’ words: “This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you” (John 15:12). To love – to be filled with a spiritual and pure love for our neighbor in a world where hate seems prevalent – is the only genuine way to contribute to the lessening of hate and brutality in the world. As the children of God, nothing can stop us from loving in such a powerful and healing way.

$ Bedouin in Desert What is it that enabled Jesus to love despite the heinous treatment he witnessed against others and that was directed at him? His works point to the profound understanding he had of God as divine Love itself, infinitely more powerful than all the hatred he encountered.

The founder of The Christian Science Monitor, Mary Baker Eddy – who faced much injustice in her life – once wrote: “I will love, if another hates. I will gain a balance on the side of good, my true being. This alone gives me the forces of God wherewith to overcome all error” (“Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896,” p. 104).

Read the full article from The Christian Science Monitor’s : A Christian Scientist’s Perspective by Judy Cole here

Mothering love for children   Leave a comment

A Christian Science perspective by Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche

Recognizing that all of us reflect divine Love’s care can contribute to a secure and healthy environment for our children.

 

At the time our daughter started the fourth grade in a new school, I was traveling extensively for work….Although she had a hands-on dad who happily covered all the bases, I bore much guilt, and this led to a combination of hovering over her when I was home and worrying when I was away. Seeking to eliminate the guilt and its unhealthy effects, I began to consider more deeply my role as her mother.

shutterstock_76332532I thought of some of the things I’d learned through my study of Christian Science – for instance, that we are all created by God, each reflecting the nature and qualities of our divine source. From this I understood that we reflect God, divine Love, in unlimited ways. God is the infinite, illimitable Mother of us all – not as a person, but as the universal presence of Love. God’s mothering care is   always with us to guide, protect, cheer, cherish, uplift, and support.

As I considered God as the true, spiritual Mother of each of us, I recognized that this was true for my daughter, too. Of course I had a responsibility to care for her. But I saw that mothering isn’t limited to one person’s physical presence. We each have an unbreakable relation to our divine Mother, who cares for us at all times and in all the ways necessary for us to thrive. My role as my daughter’s mom could include being a witness to her spiritual nature as a child of God. This idea brought me peace and light, because I knew I could be that spiritual witness at any time and in any place.

 

This article was published in The Christian Science Monitor, read it here

 

A fuller flourishing   Leave a comment

 

In his book “A Secular Age,” renowned Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor speaks to the tremendous shift in thought that’s taken place over the past several centuries when it comes to belief in God. “[With] the coming of modern secularity…,” he  writes, “for P1000061the first time in history a purely self-sufficient humanism came to be a widely available option.” And yet, Christ Jesus linked flourishing directly to a spiritual source: “I am come that they might have life,and that they might have it more abundantly” (John 10:10). Contributor Lyle Young cites Mary Baker Eddy, the Monitor’s founder, as one who experienced this flourishing; what she learned from Jesus’ teachings healed her of chronic illness and poverty. A deeper understanding of our true nature as the reflection of infinite, divine Love nurtures a deeper, more abundant flourishing for humanity.

This articles appeared in the feature: A Christian Science Perspective in The Christian Science Monitor contributed by Lyle Young

for the full article click here:

How is it ‘supposed to be’?   Leave a comment

A Christian Science Perspective by Earlene Cox

 

 

P1010665Several years ago, I placed my house on the market to sell with the brave intent of moving clear across the country. However, months went by and there was no sale. I lowered the price twice, and made some minor cosmetic changes to make the property more appealing. Still there was no sale. Then I wondered if maybe this failure to sell was a “sign” from God that I wasn’t supposed to move after all. But then I thought more deeply about it.

If a student of mathematics has trouble solving an equation, that wouldn’t be a “sign” that the problem isn’t solvable. The student knows that because the principles of mathematics are already established, the solution has already been established. She also knows that she is fully capable of understanding and applying those principles correctly in order to find the right answer.

I realized that the fact that my house had failed to sell just meant that my house had not sold, and that believing that circumstance was a “sign” was superstition. To conclude that each event in our human experience – both good and bad – must have divine authority, is as unscientific as believing that the roll of the dice or the numbers on a lottery ticket are sanctioned by heaven.

It was my deep and earnest desire to understand God differently – not as another name for “fate,” but as the divine Principle at work in my life.

When something hoped for doesn’t happen, have you wondered if it’s because of human fault, fate, or a sign from God? This writer reasoned through to an understanding of underlying cause that gave her peace. Read the full article here:

This article “How is it ‘supposed to be’?” was originally published in The Christian Science Monitor

Changing course   Leave a comment

IMGP7100.JPGBy Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche

A Christian Science perspective:  Hope to help heal the destruction and corruption of today can be gained through an inspired change of direction.

Patterns of destruction and corruption are at the heart of many problems today – from the abuse of power in politics to even the conflicts creating famine in Africa, as broadly discussed in a recent Monitor story (“UN says 1.4 million African children at risk in famine: Why there’s still hope,” Feb. 21, 2017). As we look for solutions, much of what’s needed is a change of course. But when answers require a redirection away from destructive behavior, is it reasonable to expect that we can see the change of thought needed for such a course correction?

This question is rooted in the fundamental and timeless inquiry of what we actually are.

 

In this article, “Changing Course“, Michelle explores what it takes to change major values and our perspective from a purely material view to a more spiritual one.  This article was originally published in the CS Perspective feature of the Christian Science Monitor.

Read the whole article:  Changing Course

What is Truth?   Leave a comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACS Perspective by Keith S. Collins

It seems to have become a truism that Americans are living in parallel universes. What passes for truth on the “left” of the political spectrum becomes distortions or even lies on the “right.” And, of course, vice versa.

Large groups holding passionately to opposing versions of truth is clearly unsustainable for a country that wants to live in peace. Can anything be done to help bring order to the situation? From my own experience, I believe what’s needed is spiritual insight … Read more …

This article, What is Truth?, was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.

Hearing the ‘Still Small Voice’ in the Face of the Storm   Leave a comment

shutterstock_78699079A Christian Science perspective:  Praying for safety during stormy weather.

by Allison J. Rose-Sonnesyn

On a cross-country move several years ago, a friend and I were driving across South Dakota when a weather report announced that a massive supercell thunderstorm was right behind us, following our route to the hotel we booked part way across the state.  The situation was quite serious, as tornadoes were expected to accompany the storm, and we were very exposed.

For a few moments, I felt afraid.  But I have learned through my study of Christian Science that as children of God – which all of us are – we are never truly helpless.  … Read more …

In this article, Hearing the ‘Still Small Voice’ in the Face of the Storm, Allison describes the prayer that brought a sense of peace and safety during a dangerous storm.  This article was originally published in the CS Perspective feature of the Christian Science Monitor.

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