Archive for the ‘Resolutions’ Category

You can love your enemies   Leave a comment

 

A Daily lift by Kim Shippey

P1000589 (1)As Kim gives a fresh sense of the awareness

of an all including divine Love, the sense

of an enemy vanishes

Posted May 10, 2017 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, relationships, Resolutions

Have a Happy New Year! It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

colorful fireworks show silhouettesIt’s a New Year!  It’s the time when Aussies come together in January to celebrate the good things their homeland has to offer them.  Some mark the day by having a barbecue lunch with family and friends.  Others participate in official citizenship ceremonies that acknowledge new arrivals who want to call Australia home.  Most of all, the occasion celebrates the hope that the year ahead will be a happy one – filled with continued peace, health and prosperity for everyone – ourselves, our family and friends included. So how do you have a happy New Year – one that’s good for your health?

GIVE THANKS

At the start of a year it’s important to give thanks for the good already received – both on a personal level, as well as collectively as a nation.  In this way, we utilize the blessings we have and are ready to receive more.  Such gratitude promotes happiness at home, school and work.  It makes the wheels of daily life turn more smoothly by encouraging everyone to pull together, to share ideas and learn from each other.

TIP:

– Take time to be thankful that we “live in peaceful dwelling places, in secure homes, in undisturbed places of rest” Bible Isaiah 32:18 – in a country that is at peace with itself and its neighbours.  Being thankful lifts our spirits and improves our health.

– Appreciate how new arrivals enrich the tapestry of our ideas, culture, food, life-style, fashion, and industry.

– Offer words of appreciation to others.  This fosters happy, beneficial contacts between all ages, and between old and new Australians.

– Make an effort to get along with people who are different. Refuse to be critical.  “Tones of the human mind may be different, but they should be concordant in order to blend properly.  Unselfish ambition, noble life-motives, and purity, — these constituents of thought, mingling, constitute individually and collectively true happiness, strength, and permanence”. – Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p.58

– Be glad.  Don’t be a complainer.  Remember, “Our gratitude is riches, complaint is poverty.  Our trials bloom in blessings, they test our constancy.  O, life from joy is minted, an everlasting gold.  True gladness is the treasure that grateful hearts will hold”. – W. Harold Ferguson

– Be generous.  “Happiness is spiritual, born of Truth and Love.  It is unselfish; therefore it cannot exist alone, but requires all mankind to share it”. – Mary Baker Eddy Science and Health p. 57:18

– So go ahead!  This January, give thanks.  Have a happy New Year.  It’s good for your health.

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. 

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

Love That Finds Solutions   Leave a comment

 shutterstock_173038460A Christian Science Perspective by Susan C Stark

– First Published in the Christian Science Monitor on 6 April 2016.

Sometimes the extreme needs of people in war-torn or devastated areas bring forth unique solutions and amazing kindnesses.  Some wonderful examples are in the Monitor editorial “Unsung heroes who rescue Syria’s refugees” (CSMonitor.com). …

Letting Love direct us, we discover a wonderful freedom from the opinion that there isn’t enough money, time, or talent to do anything meaningful to solve problems.  We may find that much can be accomplished with surprisingly few material resources as we begin to understand that God, Spirit, is the source of unlimited spiritual good.  The more we love, the more conscious we are of God, divine Love, leading the way, opening up new avenues for good.  Merciful, unselfish love derived from God takes away fear, or the belief that our supply is dependent on how many or how few material things we have.  … Read more …

In this article, Love That Finds Solutions, Susan Stark, explores how a larger sense of Love can enable us to find solutions to problems that would otherwise seem too big or too dire.

Clear the Clutter: A New Year’s Resolution   Leave a comment

A Christian Science Perspective by Patricia Hardee

$ dreamstime_2686909… To have order in our lives, it is essential to keep what’s good and get rid of the rest. That’s why many take a clutter-clearing vow as a New Year’s resolution. Many a closet and even a few garages get an upgrade. But as a student of the Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures” by Mary Baker Eddy, I know the best New Year’s resolutions begin with spiritual renewal.

Where to start? What must come first? Mental clutter, which I’ve come to know as matter-based thinking and its effect of sickness and sin. In the chapter titled “Christian Science Practice” in Science and Health, Mrs. Eddy wrote: “Stand porter at the door of thought. Admitting only such conclusions as you wish realized in bodily results, you will control yourself harmoniously” (p. 392).

This mental clearing takes spiritual know-how and mental discipline, … read more …

This article by Patricia Hardee was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor on 3 January 2016 in the Christian Science Perspective section.  Click here to read the full text.

From Anger and Hurt to Forgiveness   Leave a comment

shutterstock_125704967Sentinel Radio Program

Forgiving may seem to be a tough thing to do.  But letting go of anger or hatred and being willing to forgive can be a very healing experience for all involved.  On this 30 minute radio program the guests interviewed share real-life examples of the importance and healing power of forgiveness.

Click here to listen to this 30 minute program.

Help to heal our world; conquer fanaticism   1 comment

shutterstock_111413969What I most love about my country is our general lack of fanaticism – a startling contrast to recent high-profile instances of it here and elsewhere. I started thinking about this subject before the terrorism events in Paris, but those events have made dealing with fanatical thinking seem even more imperative.

A fanatic expresses excessive, irrational zeal. Far from taking an intelligent and well-informed stance on an issue, their passion and manic obsession with a cause or way of doing things colour their decision-making ability negatively.

Fanaticism about a political or religious philosophy that makes us feel superior; holding obsessively to a non-proven hypothesis; belief that there is only one way to play football and there’s a single worthy team; prejudice about what foods we should eat and the best way to cultivate them; or uncompromising belief that we only need to attend to the physical body to be healthy, are all too common habits that lead us down a slippery slope of intolerance. Fanatical beliefs are nearly always built on fear.

A red flag should go up if we find ourselves extremely sensitive about our viewpoint or hating anyone who opposes it.

Alternatively, common sense based on a positive stance, sure of a solution becoming apparent that will be good for everyone, is a better viewpoint. This demeanour is not just a good-old Aussie “she’ll be right” attitude, but grows out of a well-informed and caring approach to the world.

This is a spiritual approach that begins with ourselves – that is, feeling and accepting the love that comes from our divine source. It’s so much easier to love, when we’re feeling loved.

What will help the world through this current fermentation is our individual commitment to choosing love and understanding over hate and apathy.

I find it’s useful to ask myself: could I be a little more thoughtful and kinder with my comments? I’d have to confess that the answer is usually, “well, maybe.”

Try this scenario. If you could go back in time, would you choose to continually belittle our ancestors’ beliefs about a flat earth? Wouldn’t you instead gently nurture and point out bridges of understanding to help them comprehend the reality?

American Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, president of the Minaret of Freedom Institute was interviewed about possible motives for the killings at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Married to a Christian, Mr Ahmad holds a unique perspective on cross-cultural understanding (or misunderstandings) between Muslims and non-Muslims. He pointed out, “…it is one thing to make a joke about a rich man or a powerful man who slips and falls. It is something entirely different and not funny to make a joke about your poor old grandmother slipping and falling. To the Muslim people, jokes and cartoons about the faith of an oppressed people are not funny. They hurt.”

We all know how humiliation hurts, and most of us at some time have been down the road of wanting to lash out at a perceived enemy.

So, if we can empathise, we can forgive and work towards healing our world.

Academics and experienced change-managers in the field of terrorism psychology are stepping forward this week to share with the world some common patterns for success in de-radicalising regimes and terrorists. (http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2012/0525/Are-terrorists-beyond-redemption)

Surprisingly, these don’t include retribution but active, solution-based change-management, such as recognizing the needs of jihadists; finding them vocational education, jobs and even wives; and, recognizing the importance of their social network (http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2014/11/05/the-3-step-guide-to-de-radicalizing-jihadists/)

Whether or not you have a direct hand in these compassionate measures, you can begin to make a difference in the health of our wonderfully promising world by de-radicalising your own thinking.

Utilise this good advice to start the healing movement within your own circle:
•  “Hate no one; for hatred is a plague-spot that spreads its virus and kills at last…
•  If you have been badly wronged, forgive and forget…
•  Never return evil for evil;
•  and, above all, do not fancy that you have been wronged when you have not been.” (Mary Baker Eddy)

None of us have all the answers to the world’s problems right now, but today you can at least be a law to yourself to give up any fanatical beliefs you may be harbouring. This self-regulating action is also good for your stress levels, heart, immune system and much more.

This article is by Kay Stroud.  Her articles on the link between consciousness, spirituality and health appear regularly in APN print and online publications. For more information on these trends or answers to questions about Christian Science visit www.health4thinkers.com

Make a Game-Changing New Year’s Resolution   Leave a comment

 

FireworksWhile some of us are still dealing with the influx of visitors, festivities and sun-soaked holidays, in the back of our minds is the niggling thought that 2015 has already begun and now is the time to make our New Year’s resolutions, before it’s too late.

Some are choosing to eat healthier and exercise more. That certainly can make us feel better.

Two other resolutions that go hand-in-hand will not only increase your health but be game-changers in your life: always opt for the positive viewpoint over the negative and choose to be kinder to others.

A friend related how his acquaintance was in hospital recently, suffering from a life-threatening illness.

Things were looking pretty grim and it seemed that he was hanging on by a thread. Then his heart stopped and he ceased breathing.

At that moment, the medical staff on duty in that area of the hospital noticed that he was passing on and began to congregate around his bed …. not rushing to him with defibrillator or drip, but unexpectedly telling jokes, laughing and talking loudly and animatedly about everyday things.

They continued by his bedside including everyone in the ward in the jovial conversation until he began to regain consciousness. The man made a full recovery.

What happened? Did the nurses and doctors know that their confident and caring presence was more effective than apparatus or medication? Yes.

Something similar is at play when a teacher disregards the negative ‘label’ attached to the child and responds with love and recognition of that child’s higher nature and abilities, bringing a turnaround in attitude at school.

Or when a brick wall tumbles down between two people who haven’t spoken to each other for years as one reaches out with forgiveness.

The reasons for such changes for the better spring from (1) choosing a positive, solution-based approach, and (2) trusting our instinct to be warm and caring, despite a temptation to take an impersonal, defeatist or hard-line approach.

Lissa Rankin MD, sought-after TEDx presenter and one of the keynote speakers at the Byron Bay Uplift Festival  a few weeks ago, urges us to strip back everything that isn’t really us that we’ve learned in the world of hard knocks, to find that inner pilot light or divine spark of love within.

Research results from studies on cancer recovery and remission support her claim to the beneficial effects of this practice.

Rankin also cites conclusive evidence that an essential part of any successful treatment is engaging a health practitioner who is reassuring, gentle and kind, and treats patients with compassion.

Did Jesus mean in his well-known parable, that the warmth and care that the Good Samaritan showed had as much to do with the traveller’s recovery (who was robbed and beaten by thieves) as the bandages, oil and wine provided?

Mary Baker Eddy believed so and based her scientific, healing method on this premise. An important researcher into how consciousness affects health, she discovered in her investigations and successful treatments through prayer that…

“Whatever holds human thought in line with unselfed love, receives directly the divine power” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures)

Forgetting ourselves and putting others first really FEELS divine and invariably makes us glow with happiness.

I hope your 2015 takes wings. Seems it’s sure to do so if you choose to take this two-pronged approach to a happier, healthier year ahead – adopting a positive, solution-based viewpoint, and actively and warmly caring for yourself and others.

This article by Kay Stroud was published on 32 APN news sites, including these dailies:  Rockhampton Morning Bulletin, Sunshine Coast Daily, Bundaberg News Mail, Tweed Daily News, Toowoomba Chronicle, Mackay Daily Mercury, Fraser Coast Chronicle, Coffs Coast Advocate, Clarence Valley Examiner, Lismore Northern Star, Gladstone Observer, Gympie Times, Ipswich Queensland Times, Warwick Daily News

Kay is a freelance writer focussing on the undeniable connection between our thinking and our health. She writes for metropolitan and regional news media throughout Australia and beyond, and is a regular contributor to Australia’s national forum, Online Opinion.

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