Archive for the ‘Values’ Category

Universal womanhood   Leave a comment

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day, celebrated on March 8, is #PressforProgress. This call for action reminds me of a time when I saw, in a modest way, how each individual can be a part of pressing for, and forwarding, such progress.

 

It was my first time traveling in a particular country where sexual harassment of foreign women was not uncommon. Our group wanted to respect the customs of modesty for women in this country, so even though it was quite hot during that season, we wore clothing that completely covered our arms and legs. Nevertheless, the harassment occurred.

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I have always found prayer to be reliable in addressing challenges, so I turned to God. I wanted to understand more fully the purity of all women and men – a quality that’s part of everyone’s real identity as God’s spiritual idea, or child. In the Bible’s book of Genesis, we read, “Male and female created he them” (1:27).

…..There’s no conflict between these masculine and feminine qualities. In “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” Christian Science discoverer Mary Baker Eddy describes “man” (a generic term for all of God’s children) in part as “the compound idea of God, including all right ideas;…that which has not a single quality underived from Deity” (p. 475).

I was so reassured by this view that God’s pure and perfect creation includes everyone. …..This gave me a conviction that even if someone isn’t being respectful or appropriate, there is a solid basis for a change in course and hope for progress.

We can all take a mental stand for the expression of universal womanhood and manhood in all of us – the right of each man and woman everywhere to express qualities of strength, goodness, and purity. Because that is how we are made!

This article from A Christian Scientist’s Perspective in The Christian Science Monitor by Susan Booth Mack Snipes. To read the full article with the experience she shares, click here

SOLUTIONS THROUGH GRACE   Leave a comment

The editor of The Christian Science Monitor is sharing with us thoughts on grace as the most powerful tool to persuade when appealing to values rather than intellect

 

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                               Daily Lift by Mark Sappenfield  listen to it here

Posted July 2, 2017 by cscanberra in Daily Lift, solutions, Values

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Love’s Triumph Over Hate   Leave a comment

Silhouette of people watching sunset at lakeOne of mankind’s worst enemies is hatred.  It may be discomforting to be hated, but it’s injurious to do the hating.  One who hates, harboring intense animosity against another, sometimes feels the bad effects physically in tension and other unhealthy stimulation of the body.  These symptoms should warn him of the danger he is courting by hating.

Mary Baker Eddy quotes Hannah More as saying, “If I wished to punish my enemy, I should make him hate somebody.”  And elsewhere Eddy warns:  “Hate no one; for hatred is a plague-spot that spreads its virus and kills at last.  If indulged, it masters us; brings suffering upon suffering to its possessor, throughout time and beyond the grave.”  Yet she also reassures us, “Clad in the panoply of Love, human hatred cannot reach you.”

This article, Love’s Triumph Over Hate by Naomi Price, was originally published in the Christian Science Journal.  It is currently available on-line at JHS-online.  In it she examines the question:  How can we love when others hate? 

Clearing up “fake news” on every front   Leave a comment

fake newsThe recent disclosures about “fake news” in the media illustrate that we need to be more alert than ever to discern if what’s being said is fact or fiction.

We’re actively seeking truth, rather than blindly accepting everything we hear or read as fact. Even in the smallest of affairs, the power and effect of honesty are felt and appreciated.

Honesty is not only desirable in our dealings, it’s also linked to better health. Research* suggests that frequent lying, deceit, fabrication, or misrepresentation of the truth in our lives or in our conversations – or even accepting “fake news” as truth – can have unexpected ramifications, leading to stress and chronic pessimism.

One study at a university found that lying and cheating were common and even became quite acceptable as fellow-students were also seen to be lying and cheating. Furthermore, behavioural scientist, Professor Dan Ariely from Duke University, postulates* that we all lie to some degree, with rationalisations for our actions including the desire to look clever or cooler to others (to be the person we wish we were) or to obtain some reward.

However, in the study, cheating decreased dramatically when participants were asked to swear on the Bible or sign an honour code, or try to list the Ten Commandments before the test. Then, not one cheated!

The results suggest that, when the presence of a higher power is brought to bear on the situation, it spurs us to identify ourselves with the truthful behaviours we associate with divinity. And, this, lifts us out of poor behaviours.

Our better nature is evidently detectable despite the “alternative facts” arguing how flawed we are. When reminded of our diviner nature, our innate honesty and goodness quite naturally take precedence.

The “fake news” phenomenon is not unique to this period in history. The practice of accepting those “alternative facts,” and acting on them to our detriment, has been around since before the Adam and Eve story was first conceived; and, some surmise, is the basis for it. The allegory presents man “as mutable and mortal, – as having broken away from Deity and as revolving in an orbit of his own,” explains Christian reformer, Mary Baker Eddy.

“Spiritually followed, the book of Genesis is the history of the untrue image of God, named a sinful mortal. This deflection of being, rightly viewed, serves to suggest the proper reflection of God and the spiritual actuality of man, as given in the first chapter of Genesis.” Eddy saw that identifying the true record of creation is paramount to understanding our real nature. “And God saw everything that He had made, and behold, it was very good…”; it was honest and upright.

Having their origin in God, in Truth itself, these attributes are beyond human goodness. When claimed as ours, they give us dominion and heal what is not true or good in our lives – our poor behaviours, as well as our sick bodies.

When problems seem insurmountable, we’re basing our assessment on the fable that we can be separated from good, or God. That belief is literally and figuratively “post-truth.”

There was a time when I faced what seemed to be an insurmountable problem at work. I was appointed to a new role with managerial responsibilities in a large organisation, which also included working on a project with a team of other managers. Unhappily for me, one of them treated me with utter contempt in this new role, as she believed I was less than qualified and the appointment process had lacked integrity.

Feeling resentful wasn’t helping me or the situation, nor were efforts to try to prove myself. Events compelled me to turn from the Adam-dream outlook: meaning that every time I saw her or thought about her I worked hard to identify her divine nature; her honesty, integrity and kindness. It became no longer credible that meanness or prejudice could be part of this lady, or that I could be a victim of misunderstanding.

Gradually, she responded to my quiet effort to “see” what was true about us: her behaviour towards me changed so that there was no more friction, and we ended up having a respectful and harmonious working relationship over several years.

If we each learn how to be more spiritually discerning, we can prevent a loss of trust in the wider society. We won’t buy into fake news or images about colleagues, family, journalists and politicians; or, be tempted to copy them.

Research into lying: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2012/08/20/how-lying-affects-your-health

Video: (Dis)honesty-the truth about lies: http://netflixaustralia.org/movies/dishonesty-the-truth-about-lies/

This article was contributed by Kay Stroud, a life-long Christian Scientist, who is a freelance writer focussing on the undeniable connection between our thinking and our experience including our health.  She writes for metropolitan and regional news media throughout Australia and beyond, and is a regular contributor to Australia’s national forum, Online Opinion, and the APN regional network in Northern NSW and Queensland.

You can follow her blog at www.health4thinkers.com

or follow her on twitter:  www.twitter.com/KayJStroud

Posted March 29, 2017 by cscanberra in Kay Stroud, Thought, Values

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What is Truth?   Leave a comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACS Perspective by Keith S. Collins

It seems to have become a truism that Americans are living in parallel universes. What passes for truth on the “left” of the political spectrum becomes distortions or even lies on the “right.” And, of course, vice versa.

Large groups holding passionately to opposing versions of truth is clearly unsustainable for a country that wants to live in peace. Can anything be done to help bring order to the situation? From my own experience, I believe what’s needed is spiritual insight … Read more …

This article, What is Truth?, was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.

Love is What Matters   Leave a comment

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Daily Lift by Scott Preller

In this 3 minute talk Scott talks asks the question:  What would you do if you had just one day left on this planet?

Surprisingly most people come up with the same answer.  See if you agree.

Making Room for New Growth   Leave a comment

Woman picking strawberriesA Christian Science Perspective:  Start by weeding out unhealthy thoughts

by Jan K Keeler

It just kept coming! I was in my yard and noticed some dead wood in a small bush. As I wrestled with the lifeless branches that didn’t want to let go, I was astonished at just how much of it had accumulated in that one tiny bush. But when I cleaned it all out, the bush had more light, more air circulating, and more room to grow.

With discussions about resolutions in the New Year, I think back to that little bush.  It has since flourished and now takes up prominent space in our landscaping.  It serves as a reminder of how important it is to clean out the old, nonproductive, and negative thoughts that are taking up space in our consciousness.  A list of dead wood thinking could include thoughts like resentment, grudges, cynicism, hatred, fear, self-justification, pride, and rumination.  Such thinking stifles our inspiration, crowds out new fresh ideas, and hinders our ability to feel and express love – to experience all the joys and fullness of life.  But weeding out these old thoughts may feel easier said than done.  They may have become so habitual that they feel intertwined permanently into our consciousness and behavior. Read more

Making Room for New Growth was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor.  In this article Jan Keeler talks about how the quality of our thinking is so important in determining the quality of our experience.  Jan emphasises he place of spirituality in thinking that promotes wellbeing. 

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