Archive for the ‘New Year’ Tag

Have a Happy New Year! It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

colorful fireworks show silhouettesIt’s a New Year!  It’s the time when Aussies come together in January to celebrate the good things their homeland has to offer them.  Some mark the day by having a barbecue lunch with family and friends.  Others participate in official citizenship ceremonies that acknowledge new arrivals who want to call Australia home.  Most of all, the occasion celebrates the hope that the year ahead will be a happy one – filled with continued peace, health and prosperity for everyone – ourselves, our family and friends included. So how do you have a happy New Year – one that’s good for your health?

GIVE THANKS

At the start of a year it’s important to give thanks for the good already received – both on a personal level, as well as collectively as a nation.  In this way, we utilize the blessings we have and are ready to receive more.  Such gratitude promotes happiness at home, school and work.  It makes the wheels of daily life turn more smoothly by encouraging everyone to pull together, to share ideas and learn from each other.

TIP:

– Take time to be thankful that we “live in peaceful dwelling places, in secure homes, in undisturbed places of rest” Bible Isaiah 32:18 – in a country that is at peace with itself and its neighbours.  Being thankful lifts our spirits and improves our health.

– Appreciate how new arrivals enrich the tapestry of our ideas, culture, food, life-style, fashion, and industry.

– Offer words of appreciation to others.  This fosters happy, beneficial contacts between all ages, and between old and new Australians.

– Make an effort to get along with people who are different. Refuse to be critical.  “Tones of the human mind may be different, but they should be concordant in order to blend properly.  Unselfish ambition, noble life-motives, and purity, — these constituents of thought, mingling, constitute individually and collectively true happiness, strength, and permanence”. – Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p.58

– Be glad.  Don’t be a complainer.  Remember, “Our gratitude is riches, complaint is poverty.  Our trials bloom in blessings, they test our constancy.  O, life from joy is minted, an everlasting gold.  True gladness is the treasure that grateful hearts will hold”. – W. Harold Ferguson

– Be generous.  “Happiness is spiritual, born of Truth and Love.  It is unselfish; therefore it cannot exist alone, but requires all mankind to share it”. – Mary Baker Eddy Science and Health p. 57:18

– So go ahead!  This January, give thanks.  Have a happy New Year.  It’s good for your health.

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. 

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

This Year Have MORE Gratitude. It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

 

colorful fireworks show silhouettesWhat will you be thinking about when the clock strikes midnight on December 31st ? Will you recall 2014 and anticipate 2015, with gratitude or grumbling?  To kick off the New Year and make it a good one, why not put more gratitude as number one on your self-improvement, to-do list? It’s good for your health.

There’s growing evidence that gratitude makes you a more satisfied, happier, less stressed or depressed person. Grateful people actually sleep better because they think more positive and less negative thoughts at night. They also have more constructive ways of coping with life’s difficulties. They complain less, and spend more time working on resolving any problems. In short, being a grateful person helps you live a happy, healthy life.

 

MORE gratitude

Gratitude, more than any other character trait, is thought to have the strongest links with good health. Considered as a universal sentiment, it has long been prized in the Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu and Buddhist traditions. But being a truly grateful type-of-person, doesn’t just happen. It takes regular practice.

TIP:

– Exercise your “mental  gratitude muscle” more. Flex it right through the day. Even, “Under affliction in the very depths, stop and contemplate what you have to be grateful for”. (The Mary Baker Eddy Collection)

– Boost the health-bringing quality of gratitude each morning with words such as, “I’m grateful for the day ahead, the people I’ll meet, and for the good that will come my way.” At night, give thanks for three “heart-lifting”, joy-bringing things that occurred during the day.

– Start-up a gratitude list. Add at least one more thing to it every day. For example, “I’m grateful that my teenager tidied his room today without being asked to do so.”

– Make meal-time an occasion for conversation that bubbles over with gratitude for the positive things that occurred during the day, rather than a “complaint session”.

 

MORE appreciation

The trouble with complaining about others and grumbling over their shortcomings, is that it tends to obscure the good that’s right at hand. This is illustrated by the story of a speaker who showed his audience a large sheet of white card with one tiny black dot on it. He asked them what they saw. Each said a black dot. No one mentioned all the white on the card!

TIP:

Make an effort to boost your gratitude-levels. Don’t focus on negatives. Use your “gratitude-lens” to see more of the good around you.

– Complain less. Appreciate every person’s contribution more. This could include the volunteers who help school children cross the road safely, or the local barista who cares enough to make your coffee just the way you like it.

– Express your gratitude to others through your grace, kind words and actions.

– Be thankful for the good already received. Take advantage of the blessings you have, and “thus be fitted to receive more.”  (Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p. 3)

– Remember, more  gratitude is good for your health.

 

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. She is also a speaker on local and national radio, TV, in bookstores, at conferences and Healthy Living Expos in Australia, New Zealand, and the Philippines.

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

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