Archive for the ‘Easter’ Tag

Gethsemane Love   Leave a comment

A Daily Lift – 3 minutes of inspiration by Nate Frederick

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In the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed in the hours before his crucifixion he demonstrated a higher kind of love for mankind, a love that carried him through his impending ordeal, and allowed him to forgive and bless.  In this 3 minute talk Nate shows us how this kind of love is available to us all.

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Photo – 2012: 2000 year old olive trees in the Garden of Gethsemane

An Easter Talk by Bible Scholar, Madelon Maupin   Leave a comment

The Week That Changed The World

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Dear Friends,

We invite you, our global family, to experience a special Easter talk, entitled, “The Week That Changed The World” by bible scholar, Madelon Maupin, at Third Church of Christ, Scientist, in New York City. Our special Easter talk will take place on Friday, March 30th, Join us for festive organ music at 6:45pm, (NSW Australia this is 9:45 a.m Saturday) followed by musical performers at 7:00pm (10.00 a.m) Madelon’s talk will begin at 7:30pm. (Australia 10.30 a.m)

Is a 2000+ year old story relevant to an age of nuclear threats and nation-state saber rattling? How did Christ Jesus challenge the prejudices of his time to forever alter the freedom of mankind? Christ Jesus declared, “I came not to send peace, but a sword” (Matt. 10:34). This man of unspeakable love that knew no gender, age, racial or ethnic biases was nonetheless ready to bring a sword to whatever would limit, imprison or undermine anyone. Our special Easter talk given by Madelon Maupin will delve into this remarkable story and its place in our lives today.

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photo[1]Madelon Maupin is a dedicated Christian Scientist and spiritual thinker who has traveled worldwide sharing her love of the Bible. She has devoted her life work to unwrapping the history, politics, and culture of the books of the Bible that lead listeners to their own spiritual alignment with a fuller understanding. She does this by providing Bible study resources, including online courses and workbooks. She also tours extensively giving talks on the Bible through her organization, BibleRoads.

Madelon’s training includes a Masters Degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary. She serves on the Board of Trustees for Adventure Unlimited, a Christian Science Youth organization, the New Theological Seminary of the West in Southern California, the Southern California Faith and Order Commission, and she is a member of the national ecumenical team of The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, MA.

Madelon Maupin combines a strong business career of 35+ years with a great love for biblical principles. She has written over 70 articles on spirituality, including 35 articles for the Christian Science Journal and Sentinel, with the goal of helping people uncover and apply biblical guidelines to today’s challenges.

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Posted March 27, 2018 by cscanberra in Christian Science Lecture, Easter

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Easter – An Ecumenical Gift to Humanity   Leave a comment

Dramatic sky scenery with a mountain cross and a thinking person. A symbol of heavy inner struggles. Where to go? What do you say?One of the most beautiful and unique gifts Christians bring to the world is the joy of Easter.

At first, Mary Magdalene, who loved Jesus so much, didn’t recognize him when he stood outside the tomb.  Two other disciples, walking with him to the town of Emmaus after he was risen also didn’t recognize him for a while.  Thomas couldn’t imagine the idea of resurrection without physical contact with him.  His crucifixion was indeed jarring to all of them, probably leaving them feeling defeated and heartbroken.  But he had taught them all how to look again – how to reconsider what was going on – in order to find the living, timeless Christ among them.  (See the final seven chapters in the Gospel of John.)

Regardless of their individual struggles, Jesus helped each one deal with the meaning of this resurrection and to re-think the meaning of life and the relevance of God’s kingdom on earth.  He was their evidence of victory and hope, a sign that all the sorrows of the world – sin, pain, and even death – would ultimately yield to this Easter joy.

But interestingly Mary, the two unnamed disciples walking to Emmaus, Thomas, and the others all saw the situation from different points of view.  Their approach to the startling news of resurrection was ‘ecumenical,’ in that they witnessed the same Christ in resurrection, and yet they understood it from their unique points of view.  They were united in one Christ, as each one found just what he or she needed to experience resurrection in some fashion for themselves.

We are still witnessing the resurrection today from many different points of view.  …

Click here to read the full text of this article, Easter – An Ecumenical Gift to All Humanity, by Shirley Paulson. 

Can we really forgive our deadliest enemies?   Leave a comment

DSCN3472Father, forgive them; … for they know not what they do.

It never ceases to amaze me that in the midst of the physical and emotional agony of the cross, Jesus was able to look at the very people crucifying him and say — and, of course, mean — the hallowed words above.

So how did he do it?

According to Christian Science founder Mary Baker Eddy, a key aspect of Jesus’ Christian practice was his absolute consistency in rising above the surface view of what others were thinking and doing to what God was knowing of them spiritually.

She wrote: “Jesus beheld in Science the perfect man, who appeared to him where sinning mortal man appears to mortals.” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 476)

He “beheld” in this way even those who so unjustly nailed him to that cross.

So what about us? What if we are feeling aghast and fearful at what we rightly see as the barbaric actions of terrorists around the world — from Brussels to Istanbul to Iskanderiyah to Grand-Bassam to Lahore?

Can we actually take up the challenge of accepting that Jesus’ forgiving love on the cross was an example to strive to follow, rather than a show of spiritual strength from another time and place, to be admired from a distance?

Surely, it would be a powerful, healing thing for us to do in the light of the fear and hatred manifesting themselves in such wanton acts of violence, and in some of the public and political reactions to them.

Could the stand Jesus took inspire us, too, to pray to the point where we can glimpse that “perfect man” — the spiritual selfhood that underlies even those driven by mortal hatred to commit such deadly acts of terror?

That’s by no means an easy demand. But it can be done.

A fellow church member took up the challenge to do this during a year of violent confrontation between two political factions in her country. It had led to several fatalities. One night, she saw the political figure she most despised on the news, but this time she glimpsed her profound need to pray until she rose above her hatred and saw him from a more spiritual perspective. And she committed herself to doing just that — however long it took — before she went to sleep that night.

After two hours of humbly and prayerfully seeking a diviner view, she got to the point where she actually felt God’s love for the true individuality of the person she had previously classified as Public Enemy Number One.

Interestingly, the year-long stand-off ended later that same week.

Coincidence?

Perhaps. But then again, perhaps not. Jesus’ forgiveness of his persecutors on the cross was certainly not the end of the crucifixion story. It was a crucial factor in his subsequent victory over death and the grave which is the joy at the heart of the Easter story. It enabled him to maintain that consciousness of divine Love’s infinite allness which was able to achieve the resurrection and lift him still further, beyond the perception of the material senses, in his final ascension that has inspired generations since.

Many of us who follow his teachings today would affirm that we, too, have seen our own more modest victories through yielding to Love’s divine view of ourselves and our neighbours. Doing so has proved powerful enough to heal discord in our families, workplaces and communities.

Is that enough? Or can we contribute something of value to the wider and more lethal manifestations of divisiveness?

That’s not to say society should ignore the crimes committed. Nor does it suggest that justice shouldn’t take it’s course or that we can afford to lessen our efforts at tightening up security.

But the world is also in need of the healing power of Christly forgiveness, to bear on the deeper roots of the divisions within our nations and across borders — divisions that would shred the very fabric of unity and civility which evidence the underlying spiritual oneness of humanity as the sons and daughters of God.

Can we take up the challenge laid down by the Easter example?

This article was contributed by Tony Lobl.  Tony is a full-time Christian Science healer, international speaker and freelance writer.  He has a deep interest in the role spirituality can play in restoring and sustaining health and he writes from that perspective.  You can find more of his articles on his blog, Connecting the Dots Between Spirituality and Well-Being.

The photo above is of sunrise over the Sea of Galilee.

What Does Easter Mean to You?   Leave a comment

shutterstock_175048484What does Easter mean to you?

This question was put to shoppers by a local television reporter. Most people said that Easter means a public holiday, an extended weekend, time off work to go camping. Others said it means Easter eggs and hot cross buns. Others spoke of its religious significance, and one woman said that for her Easter means sadness, a period of mourning. Christ Jesus had been crucified. Her Lord had suffered and died. For her, it was a tragedy.

I used to think that way, too, until I realized that to focus thought only on the crucifixion is to lose sight of the real meaning of Easter. The cross was only part of Jesus’ experience, and it was not the end of the story. … Read more …

This article, What Does Easter Mean to You? by Beverly Goldsmith, was originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel.  It is now available through JHS-online.  Beverly is a freelance writer from Melbourne.  She writes on the connection between spirituality and health.

 

Easter Readings   Leave a comment

DSCN3880The Easter Story – Readings from the Bible and the textbook of Christian Science, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

The Bible readings give an account of the Easter story as recorded in the Book of John.

Every Wednesday at 6.00 pm a Testimony Meeting is held at the Christian Science Church in Canberra.  Each meeting begins with readings selected from the two books designated as the Pastor of Christian Science: The Bible and Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.  A new topic for the readings is selected each week.

At the conclusion of the short readings the congregation is invited to share thoughts on this topic and relate how they have used the principles of Christian Science to solve life’s problems and bring physical healing.

If you are in Canberra on any Wednesday please join us. Everyone is welcome.

This recording represents the readings on the topic:  The Easter Story.

The photo is of the Garden of Gethsemane taken in 2012.  The olive trees are thought to be about 2000 years old.

The Easter Message   Leave a comment

Dramatic sky scenery with a mountain cross and a thinking person. A symbol of heavy inner struggles. Where to go? What do you say?You probably know this story: A few discouraged followers of a beloved rabbi went to his tomb at first light to tend to his remains and discovered the stone at the entrance rolled away. Instead of his body, they found two angels, who, according to the Biblical account of St. Luke, said to them, “Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not here, but is risen:”

Yes, the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection is familiar to most of us. What is not so well known is that the Easter story predates Christianity and has appeared in many cultures in many forms throughout history. (Even the name “Easter”, which derives from the name of a dawn goddess, Eastre, and the vernal festival celebrated in her honour, is a relic pointing to its primordial roots.) What this tells us is that the Easter message resonates deeply in the human consciousness, and it speaks to us now as it has for millennia—of light dispelling darkness, of despair turned to hope, and ultimately of life overcoming death.

Reflecting on the symbolic meaning of this story, Mary Baker Eddy, the discoverer and founder of Christian Science, wrote, “My angels are exalted thoughts, appearing at the door of some sepulchre, in which human belief has buried its fondest earthly hopes. With white fingers they point upward to a new and glorified trust, to higher ideals of life and its joys.” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 299).

Perhaps this Easter we should ask ourselves, what hope have we buried that needs resurrecting. Is it a relationship we have given up on? A friendship? A marriage? Or is it something we believe beyond our reach? A better education? A meaningful job? A home? And what sort of stone must be moved out of the way? Weariness? Pride? Fear? Something outside our own thinking?

Easter reminds us that countless generations have struggled with life’s questions before us and have found comfort in its message. The wisdom they have gleaned is that we won’t find anything by fixating on the tomb. “Why seek ye the living among the dead?” But by gaining a deeper sense of and trust in life—by looking upwards to its higher ideals and, most of all, to its joys—we can find renewal.

This article was contributed by GG of Canberra.

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