Gethsemane Love   Leave a comment

A Daily Lift – 3 minutes of inspiration by Nate Frederick

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In the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed in the hours before his crucifixion he demonstrated a higher kind of love for mankind, a love that carried him through his impending ordeal, and allowed him to forgive and bless.  In this 3 minute talk Nate shows us how this kind of love is available to us all.

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Photo – 2012: 2000 year old olive trees in the Garden of Gethsemane

Easter and its infinite possibilities   Leave a comment

$ dreamstime_12416220“He is risen”! This joyful exclamation marked Jesus arising from death after his crucifixion (see Mark 16:6). It was first spoken by the angel at Jesus’ empty tomb to the women who came to look for him, and quickly became the happy greeting of the early Christians as a triumphant reminder of Jesus’ proof of everlasting Life.

Easter is the commemoration that nothing is impossible to God—that there is no fear so great, no obstacle so big, no darkness so absorbing, nor any death so final that God can’t redeem it. All this, Jesus’ teachings and works have proved and his resurrection has confirmed.

Jesus’ resurrection initiated a sea change of thought, which proved Life to be eternal and triumphant over death, and proved Love to be triumphant over hate. The resurrection changed lives with its promise of salvation for all—not only from sin and disease, but from death. It gave his disciples the necessary and convincing proof for them to continue Christ’s work in the way Jesus had shown them. In Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, Mary Baker Eddy wrote: “Through all the disciples experienced, they became more spiritual and understood better what the Master had taught. His resurrection was also their resurrection. It helped them to raise themselves and others from spiritual dulness and blind belief in God into the perception of infinite possibilities” (p. 34).

But does it seem naive or even presumptuous to think that Jesus’ resurrection could be our resurrection? What if one’s life seems to have caused or suffered irreversible harm? The aggressive argument that one is stained for life on account of some disgrace or tragedy may try to hang over one’s head like a curse or a personal Chernobyl…..

This path of life is described well in the definition of resurrection, given in Science and Health: “Spiritualization of thought; a new and higher idea of immortality, or spiritual existence; material belief yielding to spiritual understanding” (p. 593)

I felt God’s redeeming love and better understood the profound implication of Jesus’ resurrection on my life. I felt that “great sanity” that Mary Baker Eddy writes about in The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany: “A great sanity, a mighty something buried in the depths of the unseen, has wrought a resurrection among you, and has leaped into living love….

“… Man lives, moves, and has his being in God, Love. Then man must live, he cannot die; and Love must necessarily promote and pervade all his success” (pp. 164–165).


An Easter Talk by Bible Scholar, Madelon Maupin   Leave a comment

The Week That Changed The World

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Dear Friends,

We invite you, our global family, to experience a special Easter talk, entitled, “The Week That Changed The World” by bible scholar, Madelon Maupin, at Third Church of Christ, Scientist, in New York City. Our special Easter talk will take place on Friday, March 30th, Join us for festive organ music at 6:45pm, (NSW Australia this is 9:45 a.m Saturday) followed by musical performers at 7:00pm (10.00 a.m) Madelon’s talk will begin at 7:30pm. (Australia 10.30 a.m)

Is a 2000+ year old story relevant to an age of nuclear threats and nation-state saber rattling? How did Christ Jesus challenge the prejudices of his time to forever alter the freedom of mankind? Christ Jesus declared, “I came not to send peace, but a sword” (Matt. 10:34). This man of unspeakable love that knew no gender, age, racial or ethnic biases was nonetheless ready to bring a sword to whatever would limit, imprison or undermine anyone. Our special Easter talk given by Madelon Maupin will delve into this remarkable story and its place in our lives today.

JOIN US ONLINE

photo[1]Madelon Maupin is a dedicated Christian Scientist and spiritual thinker who has traveled worldwide sharing her love of the Bible. She has devoted her life work to unwrapping the history, politics, and culture of the books of the Bible that lead listeners to their own spiritual alignment with a fuller understanding. She does this by providing Bible study resources, including online courses and workbooks. She also tours extensively giving talks on the Bible through her organization, BibleRoads.

Madelon’s training includes a Masters Degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary. She serves on the Board of Trustees for Adventure Unlimited, a Christian Science Youth organization, the New Theological Seminary of the West in Southern California, the Southern California Faith and Order Commission, and she is a member of the national ecumenical team of The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, MA.

Madelon Maupin combines a strong business career of 35+ years with a great love for biblical principles. She has written over 70 articles on spirituality, including 35 articles for the Christian Science Journal and Sentinel, with the goal of helping people uncover and apply biblical guidelines to today’s challenges.

JOIN US ONLINE

Posted March 27, 2018 by cscanberra in Christian Science Lecture, Easter

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Fire on the mountain   2 comments

shutterstock_62922805“Look!” My brother put his arm around my shoulder and pointed beyond the outdoor arena. Willie Nelson had just arrived on stage at the 2000 Mountain Music Fest in Red Lodge, Montana, but the unmistakable plume of a mountain wildfire burst up behind him. A motorcycle had skidded on gravel at high speed and crashed, exploding the gas tank and quickly spreading flames in the tinder-dry grasses and trees at the side of the road (the cyclist survived and mended).

It was late August in a summer plagued by wildfires. Our family’s summer cabin was in the exact spot where the smoke was visible. I raced to a quieter place outside the arena to phone a Christian Science practitioner, since I felt as out of control as the fire appeared to be. I remember saying to him how I couldn’t look at this horrible scene unfolding in front of everyone. Every time I looked at the stage, I was only aware of the fire, which I assumed might be consuming our cabin right then.

The practitioner met my distress with rock solid vehemence, “Don’t you turn away. Look right into that smoke until you can see the face of God.” To me, seeing the face of God meant being able to perceive that God, good was present, right where the evidence of destruction seemed to be. The practitioner reminded me of the time Mary Baker Eddy saw a cyclone coming right toward her home and with amazing firmness and conviction asked everyone in her household to look right at it and realize that there are no destructive elements in God’s creation (We Knew Mary Baker Eddy, Clara Knox McKee, p. 193). The cyclone changed course and headed toward the mountains, doing hardly any damage.

I went back to the concert, but the sight of the raging fire was so overwhelming, I found it difficult to pray. I had been taught to always start with God, so I thought, God is All, which seemed ridiculous in the face of this destructive fire, so opposite to goodness.

Wasn’t it just too late for prayer to change the scene? The fire had already started, worsening by the minute, there was nothing to stop it. How could I see God’s face in any of this? I wondered.

Then I thought of the three young Hebrew men, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego and the fiery furnace they were thrown into. According to the Bible, the fire was heated seven times more than usual, yet the men’s safety was not dependant on the size, shape, placement, or intensity of the fire.

I realized the safety of my cabin and other properties in the area was not dependant on those factors either. God was still there, God was still All, and God was still governing this situation, regardless of its appearance, just as He had for those three Hebrew men. As I continued to insist in prayer that God’s presence and power alone were in control, I began to grasp that if it was possible to be unaffected in the middle of flames in one instance, it was possible in all instances.

Around this time, however, the winds began to pick up from an incoming weather front, blowing new life into the fire and new fear into the crowd. But another thought occurred to me, a variation of the Bible verse from I Kings 19:11: God is not in this wind and God is not in this fire–God IS in the still small voice of Truth. I knew, too, that the Bible says God holds the winds in His fists. I decided I could trust God to control the wind, and not see it as some capricious act of nature with power to destroy.

While all these spiritual ideas calmed me, I still didn’t feel I’d seen the face of God in that fire yet. I began to wonder, if God was not in the wind or fire, but in the still small voice, what was that voice saying to me? These words from the textbook of Christian Science, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, immediately came to mind, “There is no power apart from God. Omnipotence has all power and to acknowledge any other power is to dishonor God.” For me, that was the face of God. I knew in that moment that no matter what else happened or what the results of the fire were, I would not dishonor God by acknowledging another power.

 

Read on to find out how this recognition helped in this situation here

This article was shared by Patti Waddell the Christian Science Sentinel – March 18, 2008

Update: Demystifying Spiritual Healing   Leave a comment

beth-packerA Webinar by Beth Packer of Berry, NSW, Australia

Date:  Monday 19 March 2018 (Canberra time)

Time:  10.30  – 11.30 (Daylight saving time Canberra)

Please note that this webinar was previously advertised as 11.30 am Canberra time.  10.30 is now the correct time.

To listen to this webinar click here:  Demystifying Spiritual Healing

See the post below for more details.

Free Web Lecture with Beth Packer CS   Leave a comment

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In her capacity as a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship, Beth has been invited to lecture around the world, talking with audiences in such diverse situations as the hallowed halls of London to the inmates in provincial prisons in Africa and Asia. All receive the same message of divine love and healing.

But it is through her practice of Christian Science healing that the words and ideas she shares in her talks are proven true. Beth says, “that if an idea is true, it is universal, impersonal and provable. Spiritual healing as recorded in the Bible is as available today as it was then. And the understanding Christian Science brings to us all, makes that healing accessible to everyone, everywhere, always to bring help and healing to our daily life.”

Demystifying spiritual healing

This is a lecture full of heart and practical application.  Through analogies and healing examples, in ‘Demystifying Spiritual Healing’ we discover where genuine security in our lives really comes from.  The knowledge that there is a divine Principle underlying our lives that, when relied on, consistently brings peace and goodness to our lives, has been known and proved for centuries.  We see that, by looking to God, Spirit, instead of materiality, the people in the Bible found reliable peace, healing and solutions to their everyday needs.  And the discovery of the Science of Christ, by Mary Baker Eddy, shows how we too can experience this same peace, security and healing, in our lives.  It brings us to the realization that we can no more run out of the good that we need than we can run out of God’s love for us.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ashland, Oregon invites you to a free Web Lecture with Beth Packer, CS, from Berry, New South Wales, Australia.

Webinar on Mon, Mar 19, 2018 10:30 AM – 12:30 AM NSW time,  register here

 

Universal womanhood   Leave a comment

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day, celebrated on March 8, is #PressforProgress. This call for action reminds me of a time when I saw, in a modest way, how each individual can be a part of pressing for, and forwarding, such progress.

 

It was my first time traveling in a particular country where sexual harassment of foreign women was not uncommon. Our group wanted to respect the customs of modesty for women in this country, so even though it was quite hot during that season, we wore clothing that completely covered our arms and legs. Nevertheless, the harassment occurred.

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I have always found prayer to be reliable in addressing challenges, so I turned to God. I wanted to understand more fully the purity of all women and men – a quality that’s part of everyone’s real identity as God’s spiritual idea, or child. In the Bible’s book of Genesis, we read, “Male and female created he them” (1:27).

…..There’s no conflict between these masculine and feminine qualities. In “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” Christian Science discoverer Mary Baker Eddy describes “man” (a generic term for all of God’s children) in part as “the compound idea of God, including all right ideas;…that which has not a single quality underived from Deity” (p. 475).

I was so reassured by this view that God’s pure and perfect creation includes everyone. …..This gave me a conviction that even if someone isn’t being respectful or appropriate, there is a solid basis for a change in course and hope for progress.

We can all take a mental stand for the expression of universal womanhood and manhood in all of us – the right of each man and woman everywhere to express qualities of strength, goodness, and purity. Because that is how we are made!

This article from A Christian Scientist’s Perspective in The Christian Science Monitor by Susan Booth Mack Snipes. To read the full article with the experience she shares, click here

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