Why being young at heart works. Is there a science behind it?   1 comment

shutterstock_164195771 - Copy (2)Thank you to Sarah Marinos of body+soul at the Courier-Mail, for writing an article recently on the health benefits of thinking and acting younger – “Why being young at heart works“. Amongst the myriad of ads by the pharmaceutical companies, this article was unexpectedly thought-provoking and brought to my attention the work of Dr Ellen Langer, Harvard University psychologist and scientific investigator who conducted a landmark experiment 30 years ago where she had seniors live in a secluded monastery as though it were 1959. The results were surprising. After a week of living as though they were younger men, the pensioners were more flexible, had better hearing and memory and felt stronger. And they also looked younger.

This experiment was the forerunner of the British ABC’s TV program, the Young Ones that I recommended in a previous blog post, “Could it be that we all have the power to think ourselves young again?”

Langer has studied the way our mind influences our body and appearance and is the person who coined the word ‘mindfulness’. “When people are taught to be mindful in a fashion very different from meditation, they become more creative, healthier, and happier”, she wrote.

In Langer’s book, counterclockwise:  Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility, she reminds readers that many definitive-sounding medical diagnoses are in fact best guesses. In a sense, this is a book about the limits of empirical knowledge. But as Langer sees it, the ambiguity that inevitably accompanies medical research can be profoundly liberating. If we can’t be sure that a diagnosis — or a widely accepted truism such as “memory loss is inevitable with age” — is true, we’re less likely to apply a self-limiting label to ourselves.

So what does this mean for you and me? Are these experiments miracles or is there a law in place?

I put the question another way. What if society’s current standards and expectations were the aberration and health and eternal life the reality?

The consistent findings from these experiments point to a law or science in place. I understand it to be a divine Science. Towards the end of the 19th Century the author of the first and complete book about the laws of reality, Mary Baker Eddy  wrote, “Because of human ignorance of the divine Principle, Love, the Father of all is represented as a corporeal creator; hence men recognize themselves as merely physical, and are ignorant of man as God’s image or reflection and of man’s eternal incorporeal existence.” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures)

Christian Science makes it clear that mankind’s misunderstanding of the reality of being, of what God is and of what man really is, handicaps our life experience thus far.

This article by Kay Stroud was orginially published on her blog site.  Kay is a health writer focussing on the leading edge of consciousness, spirituality and health. Contact her to learn more about it, including Christian Science, via www.health4thinkers.com.

One response to “Why being young at heart works. Is there a science behind it?

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  1. It is refreshing to see more positive articles directed towards the premises of ageing and the need to be conscious of the manipulation of thought by somewhat ‘nefarious’ activities of material medical organisations. One only has to view the content o the medical advertising on television to see the ‘couched’ terms of ‘results’, and yet the ‘big pharma’ companies continue to be financially viable – it appears advertising works: feeling old and aching? see a doctor. Here, have a prescription. Repeat the process as ‘required’.

    While it may not be possible for us all to physically withdraw from society and live in a monastery, we can do it mentally. We need only to let into our thoughts what is good and keep out and absolutely and resolutely discount and discard those insidious thoughts of otherwise intent. As Mary Baker Eddy wrote in Science and Health (page 261)
    ” Hold thought steadfastly to the enduring , the good, and the true, and you will bring these into your experience proportionably to their occupancy of your thoughts.”

    It will be interesting to see the development of ageing thought if such thoughts as encouraged by Mary Baker Eddy can be imbued at a younger ‘age’ on a broader scale across various societies.

    I thank you for the article and for the spread of such thinking.

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