Archive for the ‘Beverly Goldsmith’ Category

Have More Patience! It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

beverlys-picAt this time of year, life can be very hectic. Holidays are over. It’s back-to-school and back-to-work time for many families. Teachers are making preparations. Parents are working hard to establish a smooth daily routine that enables them to get their children up and out-the-door on time. Such an undertaking can be a challenge! As one father said, “Getting kids ready for school each day would test the patience of a Saint”. What’s the answer? Have MORE patience. It’s good for your health.

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HAVE MORE PATIENCE

Teachers, parents, and child-minding grandparents, often need truckloads of patience. Why? Because this relationship-smoothing, health-giving quality of thought produces well-balanced, harmonious, daily activity. It fosters calmness, and enables us to be tolerant of delays or problems, without becoming angry or upset. Patience is so valuable and needed these days that it’s considered to be a virtue – a character trait that’s not only morally good, but very desirable in every person.

TIPS

– Overcome frustrating family situations with patience. Stay calm. Don’t let anyone or anything upset you.

– Master the art of patience. Embrace it more fully. Patience helps build emotional and spiritual maturity. It produces a better balanced mental state and attitude to family life. It enables you to move through stressful times with grace and poise.

– Have patience with learning, and with learners. Be prepared to teach kids what they have to do as part of the daily routine. Establish a logical order for the day ahead. In time you’ll build helpful attitudes and practices, and achieve a smooth running household.

– In dealing with a difficult, or grumpy family member, resist the impulse to react. Stay calm-and-collected. “Be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry” Bible James 1:19

– Remind yourself that you have an abundance of self-control. You have patience. You’ve been created a cool, composed, unruffled person. You have equanimity – evenness of mind. You’re mentally balanced.

– If confronted with willfulness or disobedience, take a deep breath. Stay loving. A loving attitude helps you stay patient, calm. It helps you keep an emotional balance. Love “…is not easily provoked”. Bible 1 Corinthians 13:5

– Remember what’s most needed from all of us – parents, children and teachers, is “… growth in grace, expressed in patience, meekness, love, and good deeds.” – Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p.4

– Be calm. Resolve delays or problems without becoming angry or upset. Be proactive. Have MORE patience. You’ll find it’s good for your health.

This article was contributed by Beverly Goldsmith who is a former secondary school teacher and is now a health blogger and a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science healing.

Have a Happy New Year! It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

colorful fireworks show silhouettesIt’s a New Year!  It’s the time when Aussies come together in January to celebrate the good things their homeland has to offer them.  Some mark the day by having a barbecue lunch with family and friends.  Others participate in official citizenship ceremonies that acknowledge new arrivals who want to call Australia home.  Most of all, the occasion celebrates the hope that the year ahead will be a happy one – filled with continued peace, health and prosperity for everyone – ourselves, our family and friends included. So how do you have a happy New Year – one that’s good for your health?

GIVE THANKS

At the start of a year it’s important to give thanks for the good already received – both on a personal level, as well as collectively as a nation.  In this way, we utilize the blessings we have and are ready to receive more.  Such gratitude promotes happiness at home, school and work.  It makes the wheels of daily life turn more smoothly by encouraging everyone to pull together, to share ideas and learn from each other.

TIP:

– Take time to be thankful that we “live in peaceful dwelling places, in secure homes, in undisturbed places of rest” Bible Isaiah 32:18 – in a country that is at peace with itself and its neighbours.  Being thankful lifts our spirits and improves our health.

– Appreciate how new arrivals enrich the tapestry of our ideas, culture, food, life-style, fashion, and industry.

– Offer words of appreciation to others.  This fosters happy, beneficial contacts between all ages, and between old and new Australians.

– Make an effort to get along with people who are different. Refuse to be critical.  “Tones of the human mind may be different, but they should be concordant in order to blend properly.  Unselfish ambition, noble life-motives, and purity, — these constituents of thought, mingling, constitute individually and collectively true happiness, strength, and permanence”. – Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p.58

– Be glad.  Don’t be a complainer.  Remember, “Our gratitude is riches, complaint is poverty.  Our trials bloom in blessings, they test our constancy.  O, life from joy is minted, an everlasting gold.  True gladness is the treasure that grateful hearts will hold”. – W. Harold Ferguson

– Be generous.  “Happiness is spiritual, born of Truth and Love.  It is unselfish; therefore it cannot exist alone, but requires all mankind to share it”. – Mary Baker Eddy Science and Health p. 57:18

– So go ahead!  This January, give thanks.  Have a happy New Year.  It’s good for your health.

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. 

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

Enjoy Christmas! It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

dreamstime_3591030It’s December.  The countdown is on. Excitement is building.  The pace is quickening. Life is getting hectic.  There’s end-of-school activities, office parties, Christmas break-ups, and holiday plans to make; not to mention, shopping, gift wrapping, mailing items, putting up the decorations, cooking and preparing for the all-important family Christmas dinner.

With so much to do – especially for Mums, it can take the shine off this happy festive season.  Yet it’s possible to maintain the sparkle of joyous anticipation, remain stress-free, and really enjoy Christmas.  What’s more it’s good for your health.

KISS:  KEEP IT SWEET’N SIMPLE

Often the race to an enjoyable Christmas – one that’s filled with pleasure, is thought to be secured by the amount of time, energy and money devoted to it.  This isn’t necessarily true.  A happy occasion can be achieved equally as well with thoughtful, humble effort and modest expense.

TIP:

– Don’t get caught up in the “I need to do it all” mindset.  Whatever you need to do, keep it sweet and simple.  Your peace of mind is what matters on the day.

– Enjoy Christmas with your loved ones.  Look forward to spending a joyous time together. Count your blessings.

– Don’t stress-out over having everything “just right”.  Stay calm.  Relax. “Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his lifespan?  So if you cannot do such a small thing, why do you worry about the rest?” – Bible, Luke 12:25, and 26.

– Give thanks for the good gifts of life you have at hand – a loving family, kind friends, a safe home, peace.

STAY BALANCED

The Christmas season isn’t solely about festivities, or the shop-‘til-you-drop rush for gifts or toys.  It’s also about love, peace and “good will to men”.  Everyone yearns for that tender expression of heart-felt love which Christmas often inspires in people.  Such love is more than words on a card. It’s the active, caring kind that can ultimately lead to a love-filled, enjoyable Christmas.

TIP:

– This year place love at the top of your Christmas wish-list – to give and receive.

– Keep in mind that “The basis of Christmas is love loving its enemies, returning good for evil, love that “suffereth long, and is kind”.” – Mary Baker Eddy. Miscellany p.260

– Show others you care.  Spend extra time with your kids. Do something thoughtful for those you love.

– Be an unhurried friend, unharried shopper, unruffled neighbour, and an unflustered family member.

– Remember, enjoy Christmas!  You’ll find it’s good for your health.

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. 

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

 

Who Will Take Care of Me   Leave a comment

shutterstock_168169064ACCORDING TO the Australian Bureau of Statistics, it’s estimated that seniors will make up around one-third of each state’s population by 2051. With longevity increasing and an aging population, governments in Australia and elsewhere are wrestling with the question of who will care for older citizens in the future.

Discussions about this are often built on the expectation that most people will become unwell and incapacitated as they age. As a result, many individuals are asking, Should I remain on my own, live closer to younger family members, move into retirement accommodation, or reserve a place in a nursing home? Will I be able to care for myself?

The Scriptures encourage me to remember that our well-being is maintained by God. For example, in speaking of a God-given ability to remain alert and active, the Bible says in Psalms: “The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree: he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon. Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God. They shall still bring forth fruit in old age; they shall be fat and flourishing” (92:12–14).

Based on this line of reasoning, we can reject the notion that accumulated years must bring about ill health and a loss of independence. Because God is Love, He is constantly caring for us. This spiritual understanding strengthens us and enables us to be more useful and productive at any age.

Read more

This article, Who Will Take Care of Me by Beverly Goldsmith, was originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel.  It is now available on JHS-online.   In it Beverly describes how her spiritual reasoning is more than just positive thinking; it is based on her understanding of our true spiritual nature.

Beverly is a freelance writer who has a strong interest in the connection between spirituality and health.   She is a full-time Christian Science healer and teacher.   To read more from Beverly follow her blog at: spiritualityandhealthconnect.

 

What Does Easter Mean to You?   Leave a comment

shutterstock_175048484What does Easter mean to you?

This question was put to shoppers by a local television reporter. Most people said that Easter means a public holiday, an extended weekend, time off work to go camping. Others said it means Easter eggs and hot cross buns. Others spoke of its religious significance, and one woman said that for her Easter means sadness, a period of mourning. Christ Jesus had been crucified. Her Lord had suffered and died. For her, it was a tragedy.

I used to think that way, too, until I realized that to focus thought only on the crucifixion is to lose sight of the real meaning of Easter. The cross was only part of Jesus’ experience, and it was not the end of the story. … Read more …

This article, What Does Easter Mean to You? by Beverly Goldsmith, was originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel.  It is now available through JHS-online.  Beverly is a freelance writer from Melbourne.  She writes on the connection between spirituality and health.

 

This Year Have MORE Gratitude. It’s Good for Your Health   Leave a comment

 

Happy-New-Year-hd-wallpaper-2015[1]What will you be thinking about when the clock strikes midnight on December 31st ? Will you recall 2014 and anticipate 2015, with gratitude or grumbling?  To kick off the New Year and make it a good one, why not put more gratitude as number one on your self-improvement, to-do list? It’s good for your health.

There’s growing evidence that gratitude makes you a more satisfied, happier, less stressed or depressed person. Grateful people actually sleep better because they think more positive and less negative thoughts at night. They also have more constructive ways of coping with life’s difficulties. They complain less, and spend more time working on resolving any problems. In short, being a grateful person helps you live a happy, healthy life.

 

MORE gratitude

Gratitude, more than any other character trait, is thought to have the strongest links with good health. Considered as a universal sentiment, it has long been prized in the Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu and Buddhist traditions. But being a truly grateful type-of-person, doesn’t just happen. It takes regular practice.

TIP:

– Exercise your “mental  gratitude muscle” more. Flex it right through the day. Even, “Under affliction in the very depths, stop and contemplate what you have to be grateful for”. (The Mary Baker Eddy Collection)

– Boost the health-bringing quality of gratitude each morning with words such as, “I’m grateful for the day ahead, the people I’ll meet, and for the good that will come my way.” At night, give thanks for three “heart-lifting”, joy-bringing things that occurred during the day.

– Start-up a gratitude list. Add at least one more thing to it every day. For example, “I’m grateful that my teenager tidied his room today without being asked to do so.”

– Make meal-time an occasion for conversation that bubbles over with gratitude for the positive things that occurred during the day, rather than a “complaint session”.

 

MORE appreciation

The trouble with complaining about others and grumbling over their shortcomings, is that it tends to obscure the good that’s right at hand. This is illustrated by the story of a speaker who showed his audience a large sheet of white card with one tiny black dot on it. He asked them what they saw. Each said a black dot. No one mentioned all the white on the card!

TIP:

Make an effort to boost your gratitude-levels. Don’t focus on negatives. Use your “gratitude-lens” to see more of the good around you.

– Complain less. Appreciate every person’s contribution more. This could include the volunteers who help school children cross the road safely, or the local barista who cares enough to make your coffee just the way you like it.

– Express your gratitude to others through your grace, kind words and actions.

– Be thankful for the good already received. Take advantage of the blessings you have, and “thus be fitted to receive more.”  (Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p. 3)

– Remember, more  gratitude is good for your health.

 

This article is by Beverly Goldsmith.  Beverly is a Melbourne-based writer on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Beverly’s activities include: Writer for Pulitzer prize winning newspaper the Christian Science Monitor; magazine contributing editor and author of over 140 articles. She is also a speaker on local and national radio, TV, in bookstores, at conferences and Healthy Living Expos in Australia, New Zealand, and the Philippines.

She is a qualified Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing with over 35 years experience.

Celebrate a lasting gift that’s good for your health   Leave a comment

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“Nothing lasts forever”, so the saying goes. But often we wish people, places, or customs would stay the same. We like the familiar. It’s reassuring. Change can be upsetting. Yet when life-changes occur – especially at Christmas, it’s possible to celebrate a lasting gift that’s good for your health.

 

Change happens

Over the course of my life I’ve seen many changes – including Christmas celebrations. As a child, I’d wake to find gifts mysteriously left on my bed. My family enjoyed a traditional English roast dinner, ate hot plum pudding and sang songs about snow and sleigh-rides – even on a scorching summer’s day.

Years later, the lovingly-wrapped presents and delicious food took a back seat, as the ever-growing extended family sought to maintain contact and spend time together. Today, cultural diversity has altered the landscape of Christmas in Australia, and a more relaxed life-style has led to barbecues and family celebrations at the beach.

 

TIP:

  • To enjoy life, embrace change as it comes.
  • If loved family traditions change, or the way special events such as Christmas are celebrated, don’t be sad. Stay buoyant. Be happy.
  • Don’t focus on greeting cards, gifts or a special meal. These outward symbols come and go. It’s the  heartfelt love and caring you give to, and receive from, others that lasts.
  • Each day unwrap the gift of hopefulness, harmony and peace of mind. This leads to experiencing more good things in your life – including better health.

Changes at home

On the home-front, special occasions like Christmas, can be tinged with sadness, regret and loneliness. Loved ones may have either passed-on, or moved to places far away. These changes may try to cast a shadow over our celebrations and happy home.

TIP:

  • To overcome the stress of change on the home-scene, think about the beautiful qualities that a home represents – happiness, harmony, love, caring, security and shelter. These spiritual mind-qualities are lasting. Best of all, like the humble snail, take your sense of home with you wherever you go.
  • “Home is the dearest spot on earth, and it should be the centre, though not the boundary, of the affections.” Science and Health p. 58, Mary Baker Eddy.

Unwrap a lasting gift – hope, health, harmony

Exchanging gifts continues to be important in many cultures and faith traditions. One gift that has been remembered for centuries and celebrated every December, is the birth of Christ Jesus.  For many people, his advent unwrapped the lasting gift of hope, health, harmony and the love of a divine Father that constantly nurtures and companions everyone.

TIP:

  • Consider reading the much loved Christmas nativity story – Bible, Luke, Chapter 2. Let it comfort, inspire, encourage and strengthen you with its enduring message of hope for peace and goodwill in homes and among nations.
  • Celebrate the lasting gift of hope, health and harmony all year round. In the face of life-changes, it’s good for your health.

This article, Celebrate a lasting gift that’s good for your health, by Beverly Goldsmith was originally published on her blog site, Spirituality and Health Connect.   Beverly is a Melbourne-based health writer who provides a diversity of health content on how spirituality and thought affect health.

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