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Easter and its infinite possibilities   Leave a comment

$ dreamstime_12416220“He is risen”! This joyful exclamation marked Jesus arising from death after his crucifixion (see Mark 16:6). It was first spoken by the angel at Jesus’ empty tomb to the women who came to look for him, and quickly became the happy greeting of the early Christians as a triumphant reminder of Jesus’ proof of everlasting Life.

Easter is the commemoration that nothing is impossible to God—that there is no fear so great, no obstacle so big, no darkness so absorbing, nor any death so final that God can’t redeem it. All this, Jesus’ teachings and works have proved and his resurrection has confirmed.

Jesus’ resurrection initiated a sea change of thought, which proved Life to be eternal and triumphant over death, and proved Love to be triumphant over hate. The resurrection changed lives with its promise of salvation for all—not only from sin and disease, but from death. It gave his disciples the necessary and convincing proof for them to continue Christ’s work in the way Jesus had shown them. In Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, Mary Baker Eddy wrote: “Through all the disciples experienced, they became more spiritual and understood better what the Master had taught. His resurrection was also their resurrection. It helped them to raise themselves and others from spiritual dulness and blind belief in God into the perception of infinite possibilities” (p. 34).

But does it seem naive or even presumptuous to think that Jesus’ resurrection could be our resurrection? What if one’s life seems to have caused or suffered irreversible harm? The aggressive argument that one is stained for life on account of some disgrace or tragedy may try to hang over one’s head like a curse or a personal Chernobyl…..

This path of life is described well in the definition of resurrection, given in Science and Health: “Spiritualization of thought; a new and higher idea of immortality, or spiritual existence; material belief yielding to spiritual understanding” (p. 593)

I felt God’s redeeming love and better understood the profound implication of Jesus’ resurrection on my life. I felt that “great sanity” that Mary Baker Eddy writes about in The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany: “A great sanity, a mighty something buried in the depths of the unseen, has wrought a resurrection among you, and has leaped into living love….

“… Man lives, moves, and has his being in God, Love. Then man must live, he cannot die; and Love must necessarily promote and pervade all his success” (pp. 164–165).


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