Moving Mountains   Leave a comment

shutterstock_160108343Within the past few years we have seen a tremendous accession of physical power to mankind.  We often hear it said that man now has the power to blast all human life from the earth if he wants to.  His latest achievement, the hydrogen bomb, seems a kind of blasphemous parody on the words of Jesus: “If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you” (Matt. 17:20).

The faith that has rocked the world with atomic explosions is a faith in man’s capacity to control nature through scientific method, but today one often finds it combined with a fearful doubt of man’s ability to control himself.

Christian faith may come to our rescue in this dilemma, but in its usual forms it is far removed from the blazing assurance and unlimited claims of primitive Christianity.  The sharp struggle between religion and science in the 19th century has resulted, for the most part, in a sort of gentleman’s agreement between the two—a state of peaceful coexistence, with the methodologies of science supreme in the practical concerns of life, and religion left to play over man’s interests as a kind of inspirational and institutionalized poetry.

The urgent need of our time is for a coherent view of life, at the same time religious and scientific … Read more …

This article by Robert Peel was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor and later in the Christian Science Sentinel of September 1, 2013.

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