Archive for November 2017

Be comforted and comforting. It’s good for your health   1 comment

Sometimes life can seem too hard to bear. When this happens we need to be comforted – to receive a gentle hug, comforting words, a helping hand, or other supportive actions. Such compassionate and thoughtful attention can lessen grief, make distress seem lighter, and bring healing relief. These tender outcomes demonstrate how allowing yourself to be comforted, or giving comfort to someone else, is beneficial, and therefore is good for your health.

BE COMFORTED BY OTHERS

When difficult times come along, being comforted by a family member, friend or work colleague, can help ease feelings of sorrow, reduce worry, strengthen courage and inspire hope.

shutterstock_145862609TIPS:

– Humbly accept someone’s gift of caring. Comfort is love. It’s a spiritual quality that soothes hurt and brings peace. Never be too proud to be comforted by others.

– Allow the comfort of others to inspire you. Comfort is hope. It’s courage to overcome trouble through the uplifting “wisdom, Truth, or Love — [that] blesses the human family with crumbs of comfort… ”. Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health p. 234

– If you’re alone. Don’t feel comfortless. There‘s a divine Love always present with you. And just like a mother, that Love is supporting, comforting and strengthening you, now and always.

BE COMFORTING TO OTHERS

Bless others. Comfort them. Help restore their wellbeing, contentment and security.

TIPS:

– Comfort your children. In times of tragedy remind them that good is always present. Fred Rogers, a popular American children’s’ TV show host, relates how as a boy when he saw scary things in the news, his mother would say to him, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping”. To this day, especially in times of disaster, he says, “I remember my mother’s words, and I’m always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in this world.”

– Express your mothering qualities. Never withhold comforting words or actions. Be ready to console, reassure, encourage. Reach out to others through the divine Love “who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received”. The Bible,

II Corinthians 1:4

– Be brave. Put aside any doubts. Do what you can to lessen someone’s sorrow. Don’t hold back. No matter how small or simple you think your words or actions are, be assured that if they come from your heart, they will be just right. You can be comforted and comforting. It’s good for your health.

ABOUT THE EXPERT:

Beverly Goldsmith writes about the connection between spirituality and health and is a Practitioner and Teacher of Christian Science healing. Twitter: @GoldsmithBev

 

 

Moving Mountains   Leave a comment

shutterstock_160108343Within the past few years we have seen a tremendous accession of physical power to mankind.  We often hear it said that man now has the power to blast all human life from the earth if he wants to.  His latest achievement, the hydrogen bomb, seems a kind of blasphemous parody on the words of Jesus: “If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you” (Matt. 17:20).

The faith that has rocked the world with atomic explosions is a faith in man’s capacity to control nature through scientific method, but today one often finds it combined with a fearful doubt of man’s ability to control himself.

Christian faith may come to our rescue in this dilemma, but in its usual forms it is far removed from the blazing assurance and unlimited claims of primitive Christianity.  The sharp struggle between religion and science in the 19th century has resulted, for the most part, in a sort of gentleman’s agreement between the two—a state of peaceful coexistence, with the methodologies of science supreme in the practical concerns of life, and religion left to play over man’s interests as a kind of inspirational and institutionalized poetry.

The urgent need of our time is for a coherent view of life, at the same time religious and scientific … Read more …

This article by Robert Peel was originally published in the Christian Science Monitor and later in the Christian Science Sentinel of September 1, 2013.

Mobilized for peace   1 comment

A Christian Science perspective from The Christian Science Monitor by Liz Butterfield Wallingford 

“[W]ar is not inevitable,” noted a recent Monitor editorial, attributing this statement to United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres. It’s tempting to raise an eyebrow at this if we’re perusing a history book or listening to the news. But the Bible speaks of a God-given peace “like a river” (Isaiah 66:12).  

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Rivers flow – that’s their nature. So this peace that’s “like a river” isn’t just an absence of conflict. It’s a powerful force for good that we can discern by shifting our thought away from dwelling on the discord and fear, and looking instead to a deep spiritual peace that is so powerful that it actually precludes the existence of inharmony. Even when conflict seems inescapable, being willing to let the enduring peace of divine Love lift our fear and anger is a powerful way each of us can “mobilize for peace.

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