Archive for September 2017

Welcoming the children   Leave a comment

Who or what exactly are the children that we see?
Is their origin in embryo or in maturity?
​Is it just supposititious human life we’re seeing,
Or representatives of God—the very​ origin of being?

Will we listen as a little child, with hearts receptive?
Will we greet the new and drop the old, the views deceptive?
​Will we welcome innocence, and love the childlike thought—
​Embrace man’s purity and sweetness, in the way that Jesus taught?

Then let us reach out lovingly to our community,
Enfolding every childheart in sacred unity,
And know that humble guilelessness and consecrated prayer
Enable us to see God’s tender love is everywhere.

Let us discern ​Love’s precious child in everyone we see.
And recognize what’s always true—for them, and you, and me.

 

From the September 4, 2017 issue of the Christian Science Sentinel

To read the poem in its original publication, click here

 

Posted September 25, 2017 by cscanberra in Children

Tagged with ,

Mothering love for children   Leave a comment

A Christian Science perspective by Michelle Boccanfuso Nanouche

Recognizing that all of us reflect divine Love’s care can contribute to a secure and healthy environment for our children.

 

At the time our daughter started the fourth grade in a new school, I was traveling extensively for work….Although she had a hands-on dad who happily covered all the bases, I bore much guilt, and this led to a combination of hovering over her when I was home and worrying when I was away. Seeking to eliminate the guilt and its unhealthy effects, I began to consider more deeply my role as her mother.

I thought of some of the things I’d learned through my study of Christian Science – for instance, that we are all created by God, each reflecting the nature and qualities of our divine source. From this I understood that we reflect God, divine Love, in unlimited ways. God is the infinite, illimitable Mother of us all – not as a person, but as the universal presence of Love. God’s mothering care is   always with us to guide, protect, cheer, cherish, uplift, and support.

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As I considered God as the true, spiritual Mother of each of us, I recognized that this was true for my daughter, too. Of course I had a responsibility to care for her. But I saw that mothering isn’t limited to one person’s physical presence. We each have an unbreakable relation to our divine Mother, who cares for us at all times and in all the ways necessary for us to thrive. My role as my daughter’s mom could include being a witness to her spiritual nature as a child of God. This idea brought me peace and light, because I knew I could be that spiritual witness at any time and in any place.

 

This article was published in The Christian Science Monitor, read it here

 

My Sleepover – Saved!   Leave a comment

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I was around my friend’s house for a sleepover and suddenly felt very sick, so I ran into the bathroom. My friend knocked on the door and asked if she could get me anything. I asked her to get my cellphone. My mum always supported me to pray, whenever I had a difficulty, and encouraged me to talk to the Christian Science practitioner who had prayed for me before. So before calling my mum, I decided to call this practitioner. I knew it wasn’t right that my sleepover be wrecked. I took a stand and decided that this sickness was like a “sneaky snake” trying to make me believe something bad was true about me.

I rang the practitioner and she told me that I was at one with God, and God was my friend. A friend would never hurt me. So God could never let me be hurt. I hung up the phone, and sat there thinking about what she had said. I thought about how I was the “reflection of perfection,” which was something my mum always says.

Lauren is a 12 year old student who attends a Christian Science Sunday School.  Read the full text of her article, My Sleepover – Saved!, where she describes how she calmly handled this incident and was quickly healed.

I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall in no wise enter therein” (Luke 18:17)   Leave a comment

shutterstock_169648079One time in a high school class, my teacher handed a student a coin. He told the student to squeeze the coin in his palm very tightly. The teacher then took a five dollar bill out of his pocket and tried to push it into this student’s firmly clenched fist. The teacher tried and tried—but it couldn’t happen. For the whole class, he made a salient point—teaching us in a memorable way that we can’t grasp new concepts while we’re holding tightly onto something else.

In prayer, as in fields of learning and knowledge, an openness and willingness to exchange ignorance for truth always brings big benefits. Christ Jesus surely understood this and encouraged people, not just to be halfway receptive to progress, but to be as totally willing, receptive—and innocent—as little children are. “Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall in no wise enter therein” (Luke 18:17). That’s a very clear-cut way to put it!

Through communion with God we can experience the kind of transformation that is far beyond just a slight shift of direction. It can result in a radical conversion, a 180-degree change of thought, where all of existence is perceived from a different viewpoint—an entirely spiritual perspective.

With the trust and flexibility of a child, it’s rewarding to work with the quality of one’s thoughts, to be willing to release and let go of old concepts.

“A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you” (Ezekiel 36:26).

 

In this article The good worth holding on to  Mark Swinney explains further how with childlike receptivity, this change of thought brings surprising changes and healing. Find it here:

https://sentinel.christianscience.com/shared/view/x9tx296nwo?s=e

 

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