Archive for April 2016

Love – The Only Response to Conflict   Leave a comment

shutterstock_19967602Love – The Only Response to Conflict – Readings from the Bible and the textbook of Christian Science, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth:  But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.  (Bible – Matthew 5:  38, 39)

Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth GodHe that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. (Bible – I John 4: 7, 8)

.

Every Wednesday at 6.00 pm a Testimony Meeting is held at the Christian Science Church in Canberra.  Each meeting begins with readings selected from the two books designated as the Pastor of Christian Science: The Bible and Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.  A new topic for the readings is selected each week.

At the conclusion of the short readings the congregation is invited to share thoughts on this topic and relate how they have used the principles of Christian Science to solve life’s problems and bring physical healing.

If you are in Canberra on any Wednesday please join us. Everyone is welcome.

This recording represents the readings on the topic:  Love – The Only Response to Conflict.

Halting Hatred   Leave a comment

nathan-talbotA Christian Science Perspective by Nathan Talbot

– First published in the Christian Science Monitor on 26 February 2016

How we see the world around us depends on our view of reality.

When an average person looks across a room, they may say they see mainly empty space – except for some furniture and a wall on the other side. But if a natural scientist puts on their “physicist hat,” they “see” much more. Their background and training enables them to see or understand “particles and fields,” for example.

I’ve often wondered what Christ Jesus must have seen in the environment of his day. The four Gospels indicate he saw a world far different from what we see with the physical senses. He saw deeply into the reality that is spiritual. The Bible says that “God is love” (I John 4: 16).  And the evidence is clear that Jesus saw the omnipotence and allness of God, divine Love, everywhere.

This understanding enabled him to heal lepers and those who were blind or paralyzed and to rise from the grave after forgiving those who put him on the cross. The great fact that God is Love is a revelation, a dawning of reality in consciousness. And it enables us to see more of the spiritual truth that can result in healing, even of hatred.  … Read more …

In this article, Halting Hatred, Nathan describes how viewing world events with a spiritual perspective can have an effective healing outcome.  Nathan Talbot is a full-time healer and a teacher of Christian Science healing.

God is Speaking – Are you listening?   Leave a comment

Jill GrimesA lecture by Jill Grimes, a full-time Christian Science healer and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship.

Listen here for a replay of this lecture, God is speaking – Are You Listening? given recently in Houston, Texas.

God is speaking in your own spiritual language…a language you can hear.

Everyone is looking for solutions! Health, certainty, and hope are on everyone’s wish list. But can we hear the answers? “When one’s thinking is guided by the spiritual laws of harmony, as explained in the Bible, thought moves beyond the ground-level view of any problem,” says national speaker, Jill Grimes. “And God’s all-inclusive law of love is not only felt, but is seen as healing.”

In her talk, Grimes will discuss the practical application of spiritual law and how it heals consistently and completely. Grimes’ ideas are based on the teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Bible, and as discussed in the seminal work on spiritual healing Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

“So are you ready to hear your own healing language?” asks Grimes. “God’s healing love is contemporary and understandable. It is universal and unconditional, not denominational. It gives you peace.”

Jill Grimes has been a practitioner of Christian Science healing for over 30 years. She has been involved in numerous healings including broken bones, addictions, diseases and depression. Now a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship, Grimes travels throughout the country sharing her spiritual discoveries. She makes her home in Granite Bay, California.

Love That Finds Solutions   Leave a comment

 shutterstock_173038460A Christian Science Perspective by Susan C Stark

– First Published in the Christian Science Monitor on 6 April 2016.

Sometimes the extreme needs of people in war-torn or devastated areas bring forth unique solutions and amazing kindnesses.  Some wonderful examples are in the Monitor editorial “Unsung heroes who rescue Syria’s refugees” (CSMonitor.com). …

Letting Love direct us, we discover a wonderful freedom from the opinion that there isn’t enough money, time, or talent to do anything meaningful to solve problems.  We may find that much can be accomplished with surprisingly few material resources as we begin to understand that God, Spirit, is the source of unlimited spiritual good.  The more we love, the more conscious we are of God, divine Love, leading the way, opening up new avenues for good.  Merciful, unselfish love derived from God takes away fear, or the belief that our supply is dependent on how many or how few material things we have.  … Read more …

In this article, Love That Finds Solutions, Susan Stark, explores how a larger sense of Love can enable us to find solutions to problems that would otherwise seem too big or too dire.

Love – healing path for the world   Leave a comment

shutterstock_161830937A Christian Science Perspective:  Prayers for Brussels and Lahore, Pakistan – an article from the Christian Science Monitor by Rosalie E. Dunbar.

Like many others, I have been praying about the recent attacks in Brussels and Lahore, Pakistan. This statement from Christ Jesus has helped me cut through the fear that would paralyze us or keep us from moving forward. It is a command that he asked his disciples to follow unconditionally: “This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you” (John 15: 12).

Jesus wasn’t talking about naive love that ignores dangerous situations. He was well aware of his enemies’ desire to kill him. He also knew that love – a quality of divine Love, God – and not hatred was the true healing power, and he was willing to trust his life to it.

He understood that only God’s love could eliminate the fear and ignorance that lead to hatred. Read More

In this article Rosalie describes how she found a sense of compassion and peace through her prayers.

Can we really forgive our deadliest enemies?   Leave a comment

DSCN3472Father, forgive them; … for they know not what they do.

It never ceases to amaze me that in the midst of the physical and emotional agony of the cross, Jesus was able to look at the very people crucifying him and say — and, of course, mean — the hallowed words above.

So how did he do it?

According to Christian Science founder Mary Baker Eddy, a key aspect of Jesus’ Christian practice was his absolute consistency in rising above the surface view of what others were thinking and doing to what God was knowing of them spiritually.

She wrote: “Jesus beheld in Science the perfect man, who appeared to him where sinning mortal man appears to mortals.” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 476)

He “beheld” in this way even those who so unjustly nailed him to that cross.

So what about us? What if we are feeling aghast and fearful at what we rightly see as the barbaric actions of terrorists around the world — from Brussels to Istanbul to Iskanderiyah to Grand-Bassam to Lahore?

Can we actually take up the challenge of accepting that Jesus’ forgiving love on the cross was an example to strive to follow, rather than a show of spiritual strength from another time and place, to be admired from a distance?

Surely, it would be a powerful, healing thing for us to do in the light of the fear and hatred manifesting themselves in such wanton acts of violence, and in some of the public and political reactions to them.

Could the stand Jesus took inspire us, too, to pray to the point where we can glimpse that “perfect man” — the spiritual selfhood that underlies even those driven by mortal hatred to commit such deadly acts of terror?

That’s by no means an easy demand. But it can be done.

A fellow church member took up the challenge to do this during a year of violent confrontation between two political factions in her country. It had led to several fatalities. One night, she saw the political figure she most despised on the news, but this time she glimpsed her profound need to pray until she rose above her hatred and saw him from a more spiritual perspective. And she committed herself to doing just that — however long it took — before she went to sleep that night.

After two hours of humbly and prayerfully seeking a diviner view, she got to the point where she actually felt God’s love for the true individuality of the person she had previously classified as Public Enemy Number One.

Interestingly, the year-long stand-off ended later that same week.

Coincidence?

Perhaps. But then again, perhaps not. Jesus’ forgiveness of his persecutors on the cross was certainly not the end of the crucifixion story. It was a crucial factor in his subsequent victory over death and the grave which is the joy at the heart of the Easter story. It enabled him to maintain that consciousness of divine Love’s infinite allness which was able to achieve the resurrection and lift him still further, beyond the perception of the material senses, in his final ascension that has inspired generations since.

Many of us who follow his teachings today would affirm that we, too, have seen our own more modest victories through yielding to Love’s divine view of ourselves and our neighbours. Doing so has proved powerful enough to heal discord in our families, workplaces and communities.

Is that enough? Or can we contribute something of value to the wider and more lethal manifestations of divisiveness?

That’s not to say society should ignore the crimes committed. Nor does it suggest that justice shouldn’t take it’s course or that we can afford to lessen our efforts at tightening up security.

But the world is also in need of the healing power of Christly forgiveness, to bear on the deeper roots of the divisions within our nations and across borders — divisions that would shred the very fabric of unity and civility which evidence the underlying spiritual oneness of humanity as the sons and daughters of God.

Can we take up the challenge laid down by the Easter example?

This article was contributed by Tony Lobl.  Tony is a full-time Christian Science healer, international speaker and freelance writer.  He has a deep interest in the role spirituality can play in restoring and sustaining health and he writes from that perspective.  You can find more of his articles on his blog, Connecting the Dots Between Spirituality and Well-Being.

The photo above is of sunrise over the Sea of Galilee.

%d bloggers like this: