Archive for September 2014

Study Shows Spirituality Protects Youth Mental Health   Leave a comment

Style: "70's look"The years between 15-25 are a time of questioning and great discovery, but I found them difficult. I had to deal with sickness, failure in my chosen career, chronic lack of self-worth along with indecision about an alternative career path, and loneliness.

During this time, I learned that spiritual activities kept me sane and ever hopeful that things would get better. Rather than restricting me or quashing my critical thinking, a daily communion with the divine and loving Principle of the universe, along with giving time to serving others, gave me a feeling of self-worth again and opened up previously unknown pathways. Things started to go right for me again, and I met and married a wonderful man to whom I’m still married.

My spiritual research has led me to understand that what I needed all along was to put into daily practice a growing understanding of the Divine being and my relationship to Him/Her.

Recent research results show that spirituality impacts directly on a range of health determinants, and has a positive impact upon social, mental and emotional health.

A 2008 study published in Australian Family Physician and written by Dr Craig Hassed, Senior Lecturer, Department of General Practice at Monash University in Melbourne, reported that “Spirituality is an important determinant of physical, emotional and social health and may, in some circumstances, be a central aspect of the management of some conditions.”

When commenting on escalating trends in youth suicide it suggests that “there may be too little attention being given to the ‘protective factors’ against mental illness, of which, particularly for adolescents, are connectedness and having a spiritual or religious dimension to one’s life” (Hassed, The role of spirituality in medicine, 2008).

It’s heartening to learn that a better understanding of youth mental health identifies spirituality as central. These research findings need to be guiding the treatment of anxiety and depression, not just in young people, but for all.

A spiritual or religious dimension to life will assist our youth as they seek (and find) their unique place in the world.

This article, Study Shows Spirituality Protects Youth Mental Health, is by Kay Stroud. Kay is a health writer focussing on the leading edge of consciousness, spirituality and health. Her articles can be found on Health4Thinkers.

Memory and Good Mental Health   1 comment

shutterstock_170530703Memory is an important faculty for coping with daily life and an essential ingredient for maintaining good mental health. Being able to retain and recall information, ideas, or instructions, is essential in caring for one’s self, completing jobs at home, or undertaking tasks at work. The notion that this capability is diminishing, or that it could be lost completely, can produce debilitating anxiety or extreme fear.

So concerning is this issue for mature aged people, that even small memory lapses, such as not remembering a person’s name, are worrying. They’re concerned that perhaps they’ve inherited a poor memory, that the ability to recall information is diminishing with age, or that it is being lost entirely through disease.

Since thought and experience are closely connected, it follows that if someone believes that memory is threatened by any or all of these scenarios, then the fear of losing it appears understandable. But no one has to fear losing their thinking capacity—or any other capacity, for that matter.

From a physiological standpoint, memory is believed to reside in a fleshly brain that may or may not be healthy; that matter is the source or manager of intelligence because it supposedly thinks, and remembers. But what if memory was actually spiritual, ageless, and always intact? What if a person was totally exempt from theories that predict the inevitable decline of the body and subsequent loss of mental capacity? What if it was possible to overcome the fear of not having instant recall, and even to improve one’s mental capacity? Is this something that’s achievable?

Mary Baker Eddy, a great thinker, author, and religious leader who lived to her nineties, thought so. She writes in her book, Science and Health, “If delusion says, ‘I have lost my memory,’ contradict it. No faculty of Mind is lost. In Science, all being is eternal, spiritual, perfect, harmonious in every action. Let the perfect model be present in your thoughts instead of its demoralized opposite. This spiritualization of thought lets in the light, and brings the divine Mind, Life not death, into your consciousness.” p.407

How reassuring to be told, that no matter what your age, the capacity to retain needed knowledge is always present. There’s no need to be afraid.  Not remembering where one put the car keys, does not have to indicate aging, or the presence of disease!

The source of intelligence and wisdom is from divine Mind.  The ability to think, is in, and of, Spirit. Memory, that is, the facility to recollect information, is thus a spiritually mental faculty. That capacity is not something that’s here today, and gone tomorrow. The divine Mind that created each person to be intelligent, to reason, think, and remember, also keeps each person’s thinking intact. Thus ideas, along with instant recall, are permanent in everyone.

I discovered this several years ago when I was employed to speak at various public venues, as well as on radio and television programs. There was a lot of material to remember for these presentations. Fear of forgetting crept in. I addressed the dread of short-term or long-term memory loss, from a spiritual standpoint.  I gave up the notion that remembering is associated with a material brain, and affirmed that memory is a permanent spiritual faculty.  When the fear of not retaining information was removed, I spoke freely and recalled ideas and information readily.

Thinking of one’s self in spiritual terms, means age and decline are no longer a threat to memory or continued good mental health.  Right now it’s possible to stop being afraid of forgetting. Anyone can utilize this spiritual approach.  They can affirm, accept, believe in, and expect to have excellent memory – always.

This article, Memory and Good Mental Health, by Beverly Goldsmith was originally published on her blog site, Spirituality and Health Connect.   Beverly is a Melbourne-based health writer who provides a diversity of health content on how spirituality and thought affect health.

Mentally Soar! It’s good for your health   Leave a comment

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Feeling down-in the-dumps is not uncommon. But when dejection strikes, it’s time to fire-up your “thought-burners”, experience that mental lift-off which allows your spirits to rise, and mentally soar above despondency. Such action is good for your health.

 

Let your thought rise.

Four colorful hot air balloons hovered over the Melbourne Cricket Ground.  From my 20th floor room, I watched them soar upward and away with effortless ease. This reminded me how to rise out of gloom when our spirits nose-dive.

 

 

TIP:

  • Take on board the thought-soaring fuels of hope and gratitude.
  • Ignite the spark of hope that exists in thinking to help you rise above negative feelings.
  • Fire-up hopefulness and be confident, optimistic, and expectant of good.
  • Accelerate your emotional lift-off by allowing gratitude to warm-up your heart and mind.
  • Be grateful for the good times you’ve had, and for those ahead. Gratitude prepares you to receive further good in your life.

 Believe you can soar.

American singer R Kelly says in his Grammy-award winning song “I believe I Can Fly” that with belief, everyone can soar.

TIP:

  • Let your spirits soar with the mental energy of firm belief.
  • Be confident that “All things are possible to him who believes.”  (The Scriptures – Mark 9:23)
  • Believe that if others can be happy, then you can too.

Elevate thinking.

One morning, two men went fishing in a rowboat. By afternoon, they were surrounded by thick fog and couldn’t see land. As they drifted out to sea, one man decided to stand up. Instantly his head rose above the low-level fog. From his elevated position he saw the shoreline. They rowed to safety.

TIP:

  • Make the effort to elevate thinking. Don’t stay resigned to negative feelings. Stand up to them.
  • Let your thought soar effortlessly above the fog of gloomy thinking.
  • Raise your spirits. Expect to “Rise in the strength of Spirit to resist all that is unlike good.”  (Science and Health. Mary Baker Eddy.)

This article, Mentally Soar! It’s Good For Your Health, by Beverly Goldsmith was originally published on her blog site, Spirituality and Health Connect.   Beverly is a Melbourne-based health writer who provides a diversity of health content on how spirituality and thought affect health.

It’s Easy to Quit Smoking …   Leave a comment

shutterstock_175438637“It’s easy to quit smoking. I’ve done it hundreds of times!” So goes a quote often attributed to Mark Twain. Anyone who has been addicted to nicotine can relate.

Take me, for example. I started smoking in my teens, like a lot of kids my age. It’s not considered quite as cool today, but then there were plenty of influences saying, “Smoking is cool.” There were splashy cigarette ads on television, magazine and billboard ads, not to mention ashtrays everywhere. And almost everyone in the movies, and some on TV, smoked.

While today’s attitudes about smoking are decidedly different, many people are still struggling with addiction to nicotine.

I was introduced to Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy. As I read and thought about the ideas in that book, …

But reading Science and Health was beginning to convince me that the label of “smoker” just wasn’t part of the real me, the me God had made in His own image and likeness. Knowing this encouraged me to take a stand for my true identity, and to take an antagonistic stand against the smoking. So I stopped. But more important, I stopped thinking of myself as a smoker. Within two or three weeks, even the urge to smoke was gone. … read the full article

This article, It’s Easy to Quit Smoking … by Mario Tosto, was originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel.  It can currently be accessed on JHS-online.

Healed of Smoking Addiction   Leave a comment

shutterstock_56195152For 20 years, I suffered because of a smoking addiction. I smoked more than a pack of cigarettes a day and could not get rid of the habit. During this time, I made several attempts to break free of the addiction, but had no success with any of them.

…  I decided I needed to do something to heal my addiction. When I got home, I asked a friend to lend me Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy, because I had heard a lot about it, and about the healing brought about by the teachings of Christian Science.

I started reading, always in the company of my daily cigarettes. …. When I reached the end of the book, I realized that I wasn’t smoking anymore. …

Read more of how this author over came this long addiction.

The full text of this article, Healed of Smoking Addiction, by Regina Cielia Fortuna do Vale was originally published in the Christian Science Herald and then in the Christian Science Sentinel.  Currently it is available on JHS-online.

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